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Sickle Cell Life Span

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Last Updated: 18 September 2020

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General | Latest Info

Sickle Cell Disease is an inherited blood disorder that causes anemia, which means there are enough healthy red blood cells to deliver sufficient oxygen throughout the body. Healthy red blood cells are round and glide easily through the circulatory system, delivering oxygen from lungs to body tissue and taking carbon dioxide from body tissue to lungs to be exhale. In Sickle Cell Disease, red blood cells are misshapen and tend to be sticky and clump together. Normal red blood cells live for approximately 120 days, but Sickle cells live only 10 to 20 days, leaving patients with a serious deficit of healthy cells to deliver oxygen throughout the body. Anemia, results from insufficient oxygen in the body, causes fatigue and eventually organ damage. Chronic, sometimes severe, pain, resulting from sticky, clumped sickle cells blocking blood flow in smaller blood vessels. The disease is caused by gene mutation inherited from both parents. Inheriting a gene from one parent causes someone to be carrier of disease, but not to have disease. Therefore, family history of disease places children at risk. Today, Sickle Cell Disease mainly afflicts people whose families come from Africa, Caribbean, Middle Eastern and Mediterranean countries, South and Central America, and India. With very aggressive therapies, Sickle Cell Disease can sometimes be cure. For all patients, treatment can prevent or help symptoms of disease and associate pain. There are different types of disease, determined by specific genetic variant that is inherit. The most common, and most serious, form of disease is Sickle Cell anemia. Hemoglobin SC Disease and hemoglobin Sickle beta thalassemia are two other common forms.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What is sickle cell anemia?

Sickle Cell Disease is a group of inherited red blood cell disorders that affect Hemoglobin, protein that carries oxygen through the body. Normally, red blood cells are disc shaped and flexible to move easily through blood vessels. If you have Sickle Cell Disease, your red blood cells are crescent or Sickle shape. These cells do not bend and move easily and can block blood flow to the rest of your body. Block blood flow through the body can lead to serious problems, including stroke, eye problems, infections and episodes of pain, called pain crises. Having Sickle Cell Disease also raises your risk for severe illness from COVID - 19. Learn steps you can take to help prevent infection from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sickle Cell Disease is a lifelong illness. Blood and bone marrow transplant is currently the only cure for Sickle Cell Disease, but there are effective treatments that can reduce symptoms and prolong life. Your healthcare team will work with you on a treatment plan to reduce your symptoms and manage your condition. Nhlbi is leading and supporting research and clinical trials to find a Cure for Sickle Cell Disease. People Who Have Sickle Cell Disease Have abnormal Hemoglobin, called Hemoglobin S or Sickle Hemoglobin, in their red blood cells. Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body. People Who Have Sickle Cell Disease inherit two abnormal Hemoglobin genes, one from each parent. Hemoglobin S0 thalassemia Hemoglobin S + thalassemia Hemoglobin SC Hemoglobin SD Hemoglobin SE Hemoglobin SS in all types of Sickle Cell Disease, at least one of two abnormal genes causes a person's body to make Hemoglobin S. When a person has two Hemoglobin S genes, disease is called Sickle Cell anemia. This is the most common and often the most severe type of Sickle Cell Disease. Hemoglobin SC Disease and Hemoglobin S thalassemia are two other common types of Sickle Cell Disease. Hemoglobin SD and Hemoglobin SE are much less common. If a person has Sickle Cell Disease, it is present at birth. But most newborns do not have any problems with disease until they are about 5 or 6 months of age. Symptoms of Sickle Cell Disease can vary from person to person and can change over time. Over time, you may experience symptoms depending on how Sickle Cell Disease affects your health. Your doctor may use a number of tests to diagnose Sickle Cell Disease if various screening tests show that you might have the condition. Blood and bone marrow transplant is currently the only cure for some patients who have Sickle Cell Disease. After early diagnosis, your doctor may recommend medicines or transfusions to manage complications, including chronic pain. Babies who have Sickle Cell Disease may see a hematologist, doctor who specializes in blood diseases such as Sickle Cell Disease. For newborns, first Sickle Cell Disease visit should take place before 8 weeks of age.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Diagnosing Sickle Cell Disease

Healthy red blood cells versus sickle cells

Healthy Red Blood CellsSickle Cells
Have a disc-like shape with a concave center much like a doughnut without a hole.Have a crescent or sickle shape.
Glide easily through blood vessels.Stick together in clumps and become lodged in blood vessels.
Carry oxygen to all parts of the body and remove carbon dioxide.Block the flow of healthy, oxygenated blood to the bodys organs and tissues.
Have a life cycle of about 120 days. The bone marrow constantly makes new red blood cells to replace the ones that die.Only live for 10 to 20 days. The bone marrow cannot produce red blood cells quickly enough to replace the dying sickle cells.

Sickle Cell Disease varies between individuals from mild to serious, but most people with it lead happy and normal lives. Mild Sickle Cell Disease may have no impact on a person's day - to - day life. But illness can be serious enough to have a significant effect on a person's life. It can lead to health problems like strokes, serious infections and lung problems, which can occasionally be fatal. Overall, life expectancy for someone with Sickle Cell Disease tends to be shorter than normal, but this can vary depending on the exact type of Sickle Cell Disease they have, how it's treated and what problems they experience.


Sickle Cell Anemia

Individuals with sickle cell anemia often experience sudden, intense pain throughout the body. These vaso - occlusive crises occur when sickle cells block the proper flow of blood to extremities and organs. These crises can affect any area of the body, but often involve: lungs, abdomen bones Joints Although pain is most often acute lasting for relatively short time, such as hours to several days, some people experience chronic pain. Chronic pain can be endured for weeks or months. Coping with this pain may cause mental exhaustion and diminish persons ability to engage in normal daily activities. Repeat bouts of sickle cell crises can permanently damage organs. This damage occurs more frequently in adults than in children. Some things that can contribute to sickle cell crisis include: dehydration, Infection Menstruation Sudden changes in temperature. While you ca control all factors that may cause sickle cell crisis, you can take preventive measures to reduce the risk of sickle cell complications.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

A Health Policy Approach

Healthy red blood cells versus sickle cells

Healthy Red Blood CellsSickle Cells
Have a disc-like shape with a concave center much like a doughnut without a hole.Have a crescent or sickle shape.
Glide easily through blood vessels.Stick together in clumps and become lodged in blood vessels.
Carry oxygen to all parts of the body and remove carbon dioxide.Block the flow of healthy, oxygenated blood to the bodys organs and tissues.
Have a life cycle of about 120 days. The bone marrow constantly makes new red blood cells to replace the ones that die.Only live for 10 to 20 days. The bone marrow cannot produce red blood cells quickly enough to replace the dying sickle cells.

Increasingly, health policy makers advocate Triple Aim as a model for improving population health. The first aim is to improve population health, second is to enhance patient experience, and third is to reduce health care costs through eliminating preventable acute care utilization and readmissions. With Triple Aim as a goal, researchers and policy makers are now trying to determine way to achieve these aims for the SCD community that align with current health care priorities and occurs at individual, provider, and health care system levels. Insufficient data, however, has limited recent efforts to incorporate SCD into health policy initiatives. For example, Healthy People 2020 contain 10 new objectives focus on Sickle Cell Disease; However, all were archive due to lack of viable data source.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

A Long Time Coming

Healthy red blood cells versus sickle cells

Healthy Red Blood CellsSickle Cells
Have a disc-like shape with a concave center much like a doughnut without a hole.Have a crescent or sickle shape.
Glide easily through blood vessels.Stick together in clumps and become lodged in blood vessels.
Carry oxygen to all parts of the body and remove carbon dioxide.Block the flow of healthy, oxygenated blood to the bodys organs and tissues.
Have a life cycle of about 120 days. The bone marrow constantly makes new red blood cells to replace the ones that die.Only live for 10 to 20 days. The bone marrow cannot produce red blood cells quickly enough to replace the dying sickle cells.

New research and better and more aggressive treatment have begun to change Sickle Cell Disease from an inherited condition that often condemns children to painful and short lives into a condition that can be managed with less PAIN and has better life expectancy. I do like to use the word breakthrough. We are making progress, says David Nathan, hematologist and president emeritus of Dana - Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, who has been studying Sickle Cell Disease for more than 50 years. You can get leaps, but most of time its dogs work. It is a combination of basic science and clinical investigators who are persistent. Sickle Cell Disease is one of the most common inherited blood disorders, mostly found in people of African, Hispanic, Mediterranean and Middle Eastern descent and affecting about 100 000 Americans. For disease to emerge, it must be passed down by both parents. Syndrome causes normal, oval - shaped red blood cells to lose oxygen and collapse into Sickle shapes. These mutated cells do not flow smoothly and can get lodge in veins, causing excruciating PAIN, Anemia, severe fatigue, respiratory distress and eventually organ failure and early death. A 1973 study put average life expectancy after diagnosis, which usually occurs in childhood, at around 14 years. But researchers say that today many people with disease can live far longer due to early treatment with antibiotics, better PAIN management and especially the use of hydroxyurea. The Food and Drug Administration approved using drugs in 1998 to help reduce the number of PAIN crises experienced by adult Sickle Cell Patients. While scientists do not know exactly how it work, hydroxyurea boosts body production of fetal hemoglobin. S tudies have found that higher levels of that blood component are associated with milder forms of Sickle Cell Disease. Fetal hemoglobin continues to be produced well into the first year of babys life and then switches to adult hemoglobin in most cases. Hemoglobin helps blood transport oxygen. Hydroxyurea has not been cured - all. It works in half of patients, Nathan say. If you give drugs aggressively, it could help 70 percent. It has been useful; It has been good, but it is not good enough. It prevents crisis of PAIN and Acute chest syndrome, which is marked by inflammation of lungs. Carlton Haywood, 37, who was given Sickle Cell diagnosis at age 3, knows the benefits and shortcomings of hydroxyurea. He has taken it since he was a freshman at the University of Virginia. From about 1995 to 2000, Haywood was hospitalized only once. Before that, one of his main memories from high school was being in and out of hospital, he say. In college, I was able to manage my PAIN crises in my dorm room. I attribute that to my responses to hydroxyurea. He continues to take drugs even though they are no longer as effective, but he has added a cocktail of daily PAIN medication and drugs to counter iron overload caused by monthly blood transfusions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Hopes for a Cure

Living with Sickle Cell Disease, or Sickle Cell anemia, specific form of Sickle Cell Disease, is a reality for thousands of people across the world. September is National Sickle Cell Awareness Month, which is recognized by Congress to help focus attention on the need for research and treatment of Sickle Cell Disease. In the United States, estimate 70 000 to 100 000 people live with Sickle Cell Disease. For most living with Sickle Cell Disease, inherit condition with only one potential cure, life can be a game of survival in seeking to navigate pain episodes, infections and various complications that frequent their path every single day. With annual health care costs that can reach into tens of thousands, how can one see hope on the horizon?


What Is Sickle Cell Disease?

Sickle Cell Disease is a group of inherited Red blood Cell disorders. If you have SCD, there is a problem with your hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body. With SCD, hemoglobin forms into stiff rods within red blood cells. This changes the shape of red blood cells. Cells are supposed to be disc - shaped, but this changes them into a crescent, or sickle, shape. Sickle - shaped cells are not flexible and cannot change shape easily. Many of them burst apart as they move through your blood vessels. Sickle cells usually only last 10 to 20 days, instead of the normal 90 to 120 days. Your body may have trouble making enough new cells to replace ones that you lose. Because of this, you may not have enough red blood cells. This is a condition called anemia, and it can make you feel tire. Sickle - shaped cells can also stick to vessel walls, causing blockage that slows or stops the flow of blood. When this happen, oxygen can't reach nearby tissues. Lack of oxygen can cause attacks of sudden, severe pain, called pain crises. These attacks can occur without warning. If you get one, you might need to go to hospital for treatment.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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