Advanced searches left 3/3
Search only database of 8 mil and more summaries

Som Ock Southiponh

Summarized by PlexPage
Last Updated: 02 July 2021

* If you want to update the article please login/register

General | Latest Info

Virke Lehtinen is a Finnish film director, film producer, actor and screen writer. He is also the main owner of Filmiryhma Oy-Finnish Film production Company, started in 1964. Lehtinen's first breakthrough film project was the short film Tori in 1962. It was an incentive which gave start for carriers of director Erkko Kivikoski, then 27 and cinematographer Virke Lehtinen, 22, with experienced editor Juho Gartz, then 30. Their film won the Silver Bear for Best Short Film at the Berlin International Film Festival. Next year trio make feature Kesalla kello 5, which get enormous popularity and personal awards for trio and enter 14 Berlin International Film Festival. Kivikoski and Gartz want to start a production company of their own, and they want along Virke Lehtinen, who had leave for Paris. His aim was to study film making and hopefully enter Institut des hautes etudes cinematographiques. He could, however, not find a famous film school, but he was lucky to make acquaintances with some excellent film makers. First and foremost, Virke Lehtinen appreciates, that director Jean-Paul Le Chanois giving young film makers great opportunity to accompany his working. This strengthened Lehtinens's professional attitude and his ever lasting love for the French art of Film making-and above all, it made him to understand the warm humanism Le Chanois had. Lehtinen had to return to Helsinki because Kivikoski wanted third success. The new film was a commercial flop, however. The Trio started their common production company. They give it the name Filmiryhma Oy-because name depicts their ideals of working as a team, and the name was modern then. The Companies didnt get any financing for new feature, and when trio tried to get financiers for their short films, they fell into boycotted by big traditional production companies. After one year, Kivikoski and Gartz were bored of being producers, thus Virke Lehtinen was forced to stay alone to end a couple of started productions. He made his first Short Onninen Mr Happy with the very talented and popular actor Leo Jokela in 1968. The script was by Lehtinen and Anssi Manttari. Onninen was shown at several festivals. To keep his production company going, Lehtinen made partnerships with some banks and big industrial companies, and started some productions and some long time sponsor relations. He asked his old friend Aito Makinen, who runs Finnish Film Archives now National Audiovisual Institute, to join the company. They produce large number of shorts, even their first TV-Documentary Berlin Film Festival. In 1968, Makinen directed the first feature of Company Vain nelja kertaa, and in 1969 Virke Lehtinen directed in Lapland his first feature, Muurahaispolku. It got Finnish State Film Award. Companies started to get fame. It produces shorts and educational films. Their social Documentary Silta was Award as Best European industrial Film. They make Finnish way for Finnair, Marimekko and in Lapland reindeer, which was Award in Venice.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Notes

The debut work of Mattie Do and Anysay Keola attests to the manner in which Lao Cinema is being shaped by the New Wave of young filmmakers determined to build a viable movie industry in Lao PDR. With Chantaly, first Lao horror movie, Mattie Do conjures up a world that cannot be fully explained rationally. She relies on phi figure, and the belief of Lao people in supernatural beings, to raise serious questions about the traditional position occupied by women in Lao family. Another film, Anysay Keolas At Horizon, first Lao thriller, provides an edgy vision of contemporary Laos. The divide between poor and rich, tradition and modernity, is conveyed most originally via soundtrack. Mattie Do and Anysay Keola are part of the New Wave of promising young Lao directors who are fashioning the modern film industry in Laos. Writing in 1995, Som Ock Southiponh asserted that Laotian Cinema Do not exist. There are no other independent filmmakers in Laos. There are nine of us at Lao-Inter Art, all of whom leave the Ministry of Information and Culture to help form a company. All of us receive our education abroad in such countries as Bulgaria, Russia and Czechoslovakia. The only thing we can hope for is that through co-Production, meaning 100 % foreign financing and 100 % Laotian Talent, Laotian Cinema can keep, at least momentarily, its artisans active until better days arrive. In Films of ASEAN, edited by Jose F. Lacaba], Laotian Cinema does not even figure in the book. David Hanans Film in Southeast Asia: Views from Region corrects this omission and includes an informative chapter on Lao Cinema, written by Bounchao Phichit, Director-General of the Department under Ministry of Information and Culture. Recently, three essays were devoted to Lao Cinema in Margirier and Jimenezs volume, Southeast Asian Cinem: Thi-Von Muong Hanes in Search of Laotian Cinema; Fanny Boullouds on Tracks of Film Distribution in Laos; and my own Emergence of Laotian Film Industry: Short Overview]. I am referring here to commercial Cinema. As Bounchao Phichit writes, Documentary Film Studio of Lao Peoples Democratic Republic produces newsreels and documentary films, on average 5 titles per year. Lao Department of Cinema, under Ministry of Information and Culture, Issue Permit for establishment of Film and Video Production Company both public and private ones]. Lao-ITECC is not only the sole commercial movie theater in the capital city of Vientiane, it is the only one in all of Lao PDR. Few privately owned and operated movie theaters that existed prior to the 1975 Revolution have gone out of business, swift decline in exhibition venues accelerated by the advent of new recording technologies like VCR, DVD player, and today, satellite television and stream Media. Anysay Keolas ' debut film, At Horizon, violent thriller that pushes boundaries of what the Lao government would ultimately tolerate on film, is available on demand on Vimeo].

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Lost in Laos

Rather western take on Laos hospitality and being close to pristine nature are key takeaways from the movie Lose in Laos. A tourist couple, Daniela and Paolo, were vacationing in Vang Vieng. While having fun tubing, they were swept away by strong currents and soon after were lose. With no communication device and money, they meandered their way through tribal villages, who were prompt to shower them with unprecedented hospitality. In being lose, they touch on the raw pulse of human connection in Laos. The movie showcases some beautiful heart-touching moments. Also read: Cultural and offbeat experiences in Luang Prabang!

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Dearest Sister

The world of genre movies can be an insular one, with low budgets and distribution difficulties that hinder even well-regarded projects. But what might seem like constraints to another filmmaker are for director Mattie Do world of possibility. When Do, who is from Laos, premiered her Horror movie * Dearest Sister * at Austin's Fantastic Fest in September, it was her home country's 13 filmnot of 2016, but ever. Laos has operated under a strict Communist government since the 1970s, and non-propaganda filmmaking only started there in the last decade. That makes Do, who was born in Los Angeles to Lao parents and moved to Vientiane in 2010, not just one of a small handful of filmmakers in the country, but the only horror directorand only woman. She's responsible for two of the country's 13 features thus far, and already has plans for third piece in her ongoing trilogy. Everyone knows about Japanese films or about films from Korea and India, but the hell has seen Lao film? No one, Do say. If you go research Laos, you find very little. And whatever you see is from the lens of some traveler who's only been there a week or two, someone who finds poverty charming. The portrayal Westerners have of my country is sham, and that's why I want to portray it. After its Fantastic Fest debut, * Dearest Sister * has spread to festivals across the globe. It was selected as the opening-night feature for October's inaugural Brooklyn Horror Fest, and screenings have popped up in Europe, Asia, and South America. The movie follows Ana and Nok, two cousins at opposite ends of Laos' class structure. When Ana started to go blind, her husband sent for Nok, who leaves her family in rural poverty and goes to the city to care for Ana, hoping to earn some money for her struggling relatives in return. But as Ana's condition worsens, she seems to be having visionsand only Nok is around to interpret numeric messages that will dramatically change their relationship. While a genre like comedy doesn't necessarily resonate outside of culture, it was created within-Do has tried to show * arrest Development * to non-Americans without success-Do found that Horror was uniquely well-suit to translation. And when the audience can connect to Dearest Sister's plot, they're prim to pick up on its uniquely Lao cultural depictions. They can understand it as a genre film, but they really start to see it as a snapshot of what's happening in modern day Lao, Do say. Because the genre is so universal, horror so thrilling, lot of people will go and watch it. When they see there's social drama, they seem to think that's really cool, too. As such, * Dearest Sister * shows viewers more about Laos than any documentarian or travel blogger ever has. Throughout its increasingly eerie slow burn, Do explores Lao family dynamics, class divides, gender politics, and superstition surrounding luck and death.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

The Long Walk

The past is never dead. It is not even past, say William Faulkner. Its idea that get vigorous workout in Laotian director Mattie Do's third feature, Long Walk. Followup to her acclaimed 2016 horror entry Dearest Sister finds Laos first and only female film director taking a risky leap forward to tell the story of a middle-age Laotian farmer living a life of regret following the death of his mother and a ghost who can help him set things right. That most efficacious way to boil down this delicately render, languidly pace juggling act, tale that manages to stay firmly ground while still looping in time travel, ghost, serial killer and occasional hypersonic aircraft. If Dos ambition sometimes gets ahead of her ability to tell story in clean, straightforward lines, it is a small price to pay to be whisked away to a country still mysterious to Western audiences by a director using local concerns to address collective truths about guilt and redemption. A rare film from the slowly developing Laotian cinema industry, Long Walk deserves its place in the Venice Days lineup, although beyond that, it will be difficult sell. Leaning on storys genre elements is the best strategy for a heady drama that could attract audiences up for challenge. Do was born in Los Angeles before relocating to Laos, Southeast Asian nation with a film industry so nascent that Dearest Sister was the only 13 hometown feature in the countrys history. This makes her thoughts on the socio-economic and cultural climate in Laos especially valuable. In Long Walk, she displays locals feel for touch-and-go rural existence where rhythms are gentle but pressure to keep food on the table is unrelenting. That pressure, in Dos opinion, will continue for a long time. Half of the film takes place 50 years in the future, where we meet an unnamed old man who has never get over the death of his mother, long-ago tragedy that triggered a lifetime of bad choices that have left him lonely, isolated and regretful. Our introduction to him included striking shot of a government-issue computer display embed in his forearm. It is not only a remarkably effective juxtaposition of old and new, but also profoundly depressing argument that 50 years from now, Laos Marxist government will still ignore its underclass of subsistence farmers who survive by stripping bikes to sell for parts while enormous, looming skyscrapers give nary thought to their existence. These near-future scenes are combined with those from the present day where an old man is a boy, struggling to care for his ailing mother, whose impending death will burden him with a lifetime of unnecessary guilt. Connecting boy and old man across decades is not only specter of their deceased mother but actual specter as well.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

The Rocket

Image 1: Ahlo leave relocation camp with his family, friend Kia, and her Uncle Purple. Three months after Lao Peoples Democratic Republic banned it from a handful of Lao cinemas, Australian Film Rocket arrive in Thai theaters in early February. Rocket follows 10-year-old Lao boy Ahlo and his family as controversial damming projects require them to move from their village to a makeshift, government-sponsor relocation camp. Ahlos grandmother and father believe that he is a curse, and blame him for bad luck that follows their family. Eventually, Ahlos antics force them to leave the relocation camp. They flee with young girl, Kia, and her alcoholic Uncle and War veteran, call simply Purple for Purple suit he never takes off. On the road, Ahlo found a chance to redeem himself and support his family when he entered local rocket-building competition for Laoss annual Rocket Festival, or Boon Bang Fai. Films recent Thai releases follow successful International Festival run, including three awards Tribeca Film Festival in New York, inclusion in Sundances touring program, Best International Feature Film at Los Angeless AFI Fest, and an Oscar campaign as Australias offering for Best Foreign Language Film. Luang Prabang Film Festival invited Rocket to screen at its annual event last December. Although LPFF generally showcases only Southeast Asian films, Rocket's strong Lao identity makes it an obvious feature. Australian director Kim Mordaunt shot Rocket on location in Laos, with Lao and Thai actors, all in the Lao Language. Lao censors, however, moved fast to ban Rocket in November. The reasons for the ban seem obvious. The film features Ahlos and his familys force relocation for Australian-Lao dam project, mirroring real-life controversy surrounding hydroelectric dam proposals on the Mekong River. Image 2: Young Actor Sitthiphon Disamoe won Best Actor at the Tribeca Film Festival for his performance. Mordaunt and his production team, however, were carefully supervise throughout their shoot in Laos. Mordaunt already had close relationships with Lao government ministries after his 2007 Feature Bomb Harvest. A Documentary following Lao children who collect unexploded ordnance to sell as scrap medal, Bomb Harvest has been screened twice a day at Vientiane UXO awareness center for the past six years. Following in the steps of Bomb Harvest, Rocket's plot and imagery focus on UXO that still covers Laos nearly half a century after the US secret Vietnam War bombing campaign. Also, like Bomb Harvest, Rocket places blame for Laoss woes primarily on foreign, rather than domestic, actors. Both films direct viewers ' attention to the continuing effects of American military intervention in Laos. Rocket goes further to include controversial dam projects. Mordaunt is quick to remind viewers, however, that dam project in the film is an Australian-Lao collaboration. This power dynamic focuses audience attention not on Lao government actions, but on externally imposing violence and constraints.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

logo

Plex.page is an Online Knowledge, where all the summaries are written by a machine. We aim to collect all the knowledge the World Wide Web has to offer.

Partners:
Nvidia inception logo

© All rights reserved
2021 made by Algoritmi Vision Inc.

If you believe that any of the summaries on our website lead to misinformation, don't hesitate to contact us. We will immediately review it and remove the summaries if necessary.

If your domain is listed as one of the sources on any summary, you can consider participating in the "Online Knowledge" program, if you want to proceed, please follow these instructions to apply.
However, if you still want us to remove all links leading to your domain from Plex.page and never use your website as a source, please follow these instructions.