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Stress And Heart Attack

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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Most Heart Attacks are due to coronary arteries being blocked by blood clots that form when plaques of cholesterol rupture. Lack of blood flow through blocked arteries results in heart muscle dying, hence the name Heart attack. However, there is another form of heart attack called Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Over the past few years, physicians have come to recognize and better understand this form of heart attack. This unusual type of heart attack does not involve rupturing plaques or blocking blood vessels. It is called Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or Stress cardiomyopathy. Japanese doctors, who were first to describe this condition, named it Takotsubo because during this disorder, heart takes on a distinctive shape that resembles Japanese pot used to trap octopus. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is commonly believed to be caused by sudden emotional stress, such as the death of a child, and to be far less harmful than a typical heart attack. For that reason, some have also labelled this condition broken - Heart syndrome. Study in September 3rd 2015 issue of New England Journal of Medicine reports on the work of an international collaboration of physicians from the United States and Europe that studied 1 750 patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Interestingly, 90% of these cases occur in women, and women in this study were an average of 67 years old. The most common triggers of Stress cardiomyopathy were physical, and the next most common cause was emotional shock. But in a substantial proportion of patients, there was no trigger that could be identify. Compared with people who had experienced typical heart attack, patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy were almost twice as likely to have psychological or psychiatric disorder. And in contrast to the commonly - held belief among doctors that Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is less serious than other forms of heart attack, rates of death in hospital from Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and more traditional heart attacks were similar. As awareness of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy increases among physicians and patients, I suspect we will be recognizing even more cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the future. Conditions certainly do not appear to be as rare as was suspect, nor as harmless as had been believe. Future research will be needed to determine the best care for patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and lower their risk for future problems. Right now, we often use the same medications to treat weakened heart muscle in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy as we do with other forms of heart attack, but there really are not many good studies yet regarding optimal medication choices for people who have experienced Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. The link with neurological or psychiatric disorders is intriguing, and suggests that important heart - mind connection is relevant to some manifestations of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, and possibly to other cardiac conditions as well. As I tell recently in my article Stress as Cause of Heart Attacks - Myogenic Theory, etiology of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is better explained by the Myogenic Theory of Heart disease.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Stress and Your Heart

More research is needed to determine how stress contributes to heart disease, leading killer of Americans. But stress may affect behaviors and factors that increase heart disease risk: high blood pressure and cholesterol levels, smoking, physical inactivity and overeating. Some people may choose to drink too much alcohol or smoke cigarettes to manage their chronic stress, however these habits can increase blood pressure and may damage artery walls. And your body's response to stress may be headache, back strain, or stomach pains. Stress can also zap your energy, wreak havoc on your sleep and make you feel cranky, forgetful and out of control. Stressful situations set off a chain of events. Your body releases adrenaline, hormone that temporarily causes your breathing and heart rate to speed up and your blood pressure to rise. These reactions prepare you to deal with situation fight or flight response. When stress is constant, your body remains in high gear off and on for days or weeks at time. Although the link between stress and heart disease isnt clear, chronic stress may cause some people to drink too much alcohol, which can increase your blood pressure and may damage artery walls.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Mitral Valve Prolapse

Symptoms of Panic disorder have long been considered to be part of psychiatric condition, although they started to acquire greater relevance with the introduction of Panic disorder and of agoraphobia with Panic attacks as diagnostic categories in DSM - III in 1980. In the 1960s, Barlow and Bosman, 1 using leave ventricular cineangiography, first identified origin of late Mitral systolic murmur, and later, Criley et al. 2 name this condition is Mitral valve prolapse. Starting in the 1980s with dissemination of use of echocardiography, epidemic of MVP diagnoses occur, especially among young women, 3 4 and understanding of normal and anomalous anatomy of Mitral valve greatly evolved thereafter. 3 5 cardiovascular complaints are among the most frequent in Panic disorder, accompanied by marked anguish,. 6 7 and Panic attacks are often accompanied by tachycardia. 7 8 Patients with MVP and Panic disorder complain of palpitations, chest pain, dyspnea, fatigue, dizziness, and fainting sensation. 9 10 This similarity of many symptoms leads to speculation that in many cases, panic disorder could be caused by MVP or, conversely, that panic disorder might lead to MVP. 11 - 14 results of research on possible connection between MVP and Panic disorder,. However, have been inconsistent regarding the strength of this Association. 15 As will be demonstrated in the present review, this inconsistency may be caused by 3 major problems: widely differing diagnostic criteria for MVP, lack of reliability of diagnoses, and sample biases in case and control groups. The objectives of the present review were to survey studies on prevalence of MVP in Panic disorder and of Panic disorder in MVP and to discuss criteria for diagnosis of MVP use in various studies.


What are the symptoms of MVP?

Mvp may not cause any symptoms. Symptoms may vary depending on the degree of prolapse present. Presence of symptoms doesn't necessarily match severity of MVP. Fast or irregular heartbeats. This may be the result of irregular heartbeats or just a sensation of valve closing when heart rhythm is normal. Chest pain. Chest pain linked to MVP is different from chest pain associated with coronary artery disease. Usually, chest pain is not like classic angina, such as pain with exertion, but it can happen often, can be very uncomfortable, and can affect your quality of life. Anxiety Hyperventilation Exercise intolerance Dizziness depends on severity of mitral regurgitation or leak, leave atrium or left ventricle may become enlarged, leading to symptoms of heart failure. These symptoms include weakness, tiredness, dizziness, and shortness of breath. Symptoms of mitral valve prolapse may look like other medical conditions or problems. Always see healthcare provider for diagnosis.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Scope of the Review

Cvds are the leading cause of death in both men and women of every major ethnic group in the United States, of which CHD is the most prevalent. 1 in 2014, > 600 000 Americans were estimated to have new coronary event and 300 000 had recurrent event.S 2 Between 2013 and 2030, medical costs of CHD are projected to increase by 100%, 3 highlighting growing health and socioeconomic problem.S Nevertheless, CHD may be preventable, 4 and preventative strategies are costeffective. 5 Identification of atrisk groups and appropriately addressing risk factors form cornerstone of successful management, and can be achieved using multivariable riskprediction algorithms, 6 7 8 9 of which are most widely used in clinical practice are Framinghambased models. These scores assign weights to different levels of traditional risk factors, such as age, total cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure, which are combined to generate absolute probability of developing CHD within a specified time frame. Framinghambased risk prediction models are well establish, practical, and easy to use, supported by large amounts of data and in most cohorts discriminate risk well, after calibration, where necessary. 10 Nevertheless, Framinghambased scores are limited by incorporating a limited number of risk factors, such as age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and smoking, which have been identified from historically based population studies. 11 Alternative tools to assist in risk prevention have been develop, including the American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7, which identifies construct of ideal cardiovascular health characterized by ideal health behaviors: nonsmoking, body mass index < 25 kg / m 2, physical activity at goal levels, pursuit of diet consistent with current guideline recommendations, and ideal Health factors. 12 Although these individual concepts are well supported in literature, Life's Simple 7 focuses exclusively on conventional cardiovascular risk factors, which in themselves account for between 58% and 72% of all incident cases of CHD. 13 Alternative nonconventional risk factors may account for some of this gap and are becoming increasingly important, particularly as effects of previously implemented attempts at managing conventional risk factors are being see. For example, recent Time trend analysis shows that patients presenting to catheterization laboratory with CHD had better blood pressure and lipid profiles between 2006 and 2010, compared with between 1994 and 1999, which may reflect improved uptake of primary and secondary Preventative strategies, such as smoking cessation. 15 There was also a higher proportion of patients taking riskmodifying cardiovascular medication. 16 Furthermore, in one study of young adults hospitalized with their first myocardial infarction, < 25% would qualify for lipidlowering therapy based on guidelines available at time, 17 Further demonstrating limitation of current riskbased algorithms. Thus, there is a need to identify and account for novel risk factors not currently accounted for in traditional risk prevention models. Increasing awareness of social and psychological determinants of Health 18 has opened up novel avenues in which the contribution of these risk factors to the cause, development, and outcome of CHD 19 20 21 is becoming increasingly understood.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Acute Stressors

Earthquakes are unique disasters because they come with no warning. In addition, survivors are troubled by continuing aftershocks, which are ambiguous in their implications. Widespread disasters cripple communications and transportation infrastructures. Although 1 - day interruption of electricity and water can be cop with, large - scale disasters typically result in multiple days or weeks of turmoil, inconvenience, worry, and loss. Of course, such disasters have adverse effects on psychiatric morbidity, but what happens to the heart? Extensive international data demonstrates increased cardiovascular risk after earthquakes. The underlying mechanism for this risk is unclear. Give emergency conditions surrounding massive earthquake, it is difficult to conduct fine - grained experimental or epidemiologic studies. Thus, it is not know how much of risk is conveyed by emotional trauma acting alone versus factors like forgetting to take routine medications, living in cramped emergency quarters, facing disrupted sleep, and so on. Give the chaos surrounding massive disasters, it is unlikely that such data would ever be gather. During the 1999 earthquake in Taiwan, 12 patients were being routinely studied with Holter monitoring. When Holter was score, contrasting minutes before and minutes after the earthquake, pronounced increases in heart rate were observed at time of quake, up to 160 beats / min. Perhaps more interesting was the observation that HR variability itself change, with a relative drop in high - frequency variability and increase in low - frequency / high - frequency ratio, denoting relative withdrawal of parasympathetic nervous system activity and increase in sympathetic nervous system activity. These changes were attenuated in patients who were receiving beta - blockers. Dating back to Cannon's work, investigators have observed stressor effects on various components of the hemostasis system. The Hanshin - Awaji earthquake in Japan in 1995 provided an opportunity to examine hemostatic changes in the face of massive stress. In addition to noting that BP increases and that some patients ' nocturnal BP no longer dips after earthquake, observers report that blood viscosity increases as reflected by increases in hematocrit and markers of procoagulant activity also increase. There is an increased risk of pulmonary embolism in the wake of earthquakes. In 2004, Central Nigata, Japan, was struck by 3 strong earthquakes and 90 aftershocks in the ensuing week. One hundred thousand residents were evacuated from their homes, and many of them spent nights sleeping in their cars. The combination of psychological stress and relative immobilization in cars results in a dramatic increase in pulmonary embolism. The Northridge, California earthquake in 1994 was well studied in terms of cardiovascular consequences. Daily numbers of deaths attributed to cardiovascular disease increased dramatically on the day of the earthquake, in contrast with the same date in previous years. Data are not unanimous about the impact of earthquakes on the heart. Brown, for instance, found that the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake in California was not associated with an increase in myocardial infarctions. However, Brown points out that earthquakes are not all the same.


Stress and your heart

The relationship between stress, heart disease and sudden death has been recognized since antiquity. The Incidences of heart attacks and sudden death have been shown to increase significantly following acute stress of natural disasters like hurricanes, earthquakes and tsunamis and as a consequence of any severe stressor that evokes fight or flight responses. Coronary heart disease is also much more common in individuals subject to chronic stress and recent research has focused on how to identify and prevent this growing problem, particularly with respect to job stress. In many instances, we create our own stress that contributes to coronary disease by smoking and other faulty lifestyles or because of dangerous traits like excess anger, hostility, aggressiveness, time urgency, inappropriate competitiveness and preoccupation with work. These are characteristics of Type coronary prone behavior, now recognized to be a significant risk factor for heart attacks and coronary events such as cigarette consumption, elevated cholesterol and blood pressure. While Type behavior can also increase the likelihood of these standard risk factors, its strong correlation with coronary heart disease persists even when these influences have been exclude. However, there is considerable confusion about how to diagnose and measure Type behavior and numerous misconceptions about which components are common. As indicated in an interview with Dr. Ray Rosenman, one of the co - authors of the Type behavior concept. The following discussion is designed to clarify these and other aspects of the role of emotions and behavior in heart disease and how this may relate to an explosive increase in job stress. References have also been provided to obtain additional details on items that may be of special interest.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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