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Tana French

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Last Updated: 03 December 2020

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Tana French

Alma materTrinity College
Born( 1973-05-10 ) May 10, 1973 (age 47) Burlington, Vermont , United States
FacebookTanaFrench
NationalityAmerican

Tana French has written seven novels, with the eighth due in October. There are important things they have in common. Theyre superb. Theyre set in Ireland. They pull you way down rabbit holes. They play devious tricks with memory. And theyll work as Haunting diversions from stasis now. A few basic things you should know about French: She is American. She was born in Vermont and lives in many places, including Italy and Malawi, though her command of Irish accents and personalities has filled French Dublin with a large, fictitious population. She is now based in Ireland. Dublin Murder Squad figures in most but not all of her books. She often writes about lost or traumatized children. She read Stephen Kings It in her early teens and was fascinated by the ability of children terrorized by evil clowns to block memories of their horror. And she was an actress train at Trinity College in Dublin before she started writing. In fact, she was at work on archaeological dig between shows when she saw something that inspired in Woods, her Edgar-winning 2007 debut novel. In Woods make Rob the sole survivor of a terrible incident that happened when he was 12, in which two other boys disappear. Then It gives him and Cassie another child murder to investigate in the same wooded region two decades later. Strain on Robs ' memory, eeriness of situation and plot juggling all become tools of the French trade.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Novels

Table

No.TitlePublisherDateISBN
1In the WoodsViking Penguin30 January 2007ISBN 978-0-670-03860-2
2The LikenessViking Penguin17 July 2008ISBN 978-0143115625
3Faithful PlaceViking Penguin13 July 2010ISBN 978-0670021871
4Broken HarbourViking Penguin2 July 2012ISBN 978-0-670-02365-3
5The Secret PlaceViking Penguin28 August 2014ISBN 978-0-670-02632-6
6The TrespasserViking Penguin22 September 2016ISBN 978-1-444-75562-6
7The Wych Elm/The Witch ElmViking Penguin9 October 2018ISBN 978-0-735-22462-9
8The SearcherViking Penguin6 October 2020ISBN 978-0-735-22465-0

Iam bit late to party on Irish crime writer, Tana French, whose first novel in Woods was released nearly a decade ago. It came out just before Girl with Dragon Tattoo hit bookshelves, and despite winning a slew of awards, I suspect it may have slipped under other peopleas radars as well as mine with the onslaught of Scando-crime that follow. As a result, Iave come to the conclusion that the Frenchas Dublin Murder Squad series is one of the best-kept secrets in the crime genre. Her focus on strong characters and character development over sensationalistic depictions of violence is refreshing, while her mysteries are deeply compelling, and incredibly diverse. Five books in the series feature different detectives and vastly different scenarios. You can read each book as a stand-alone, or as a series. Here they all are, in order of publication, just in case you want to chain read them all, back-to-back.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Tana French Books In Order

Although she was originally born in America, Tana French move over many countries across the world as a child, including Ireland, Malawi and Italy. This was due to her father being an economist involved in resource management internationally, which was spread over much of the developing world. It was only in 1990 that she was to finally settle in Dublin, city which she now deems as home. She first attended Trinity College in Dublin as she became trained in acting, ultimately giving her insight into characterizations and creating inner dialogues. This was to inform much of her writing as it allowed her to develop her protagonists with far more depth, providing greater substance. Many have commented on this over the years, as it is this trait which has helped pave the way for much of her critical acclaim. French also manage to develop this talent through her voice-over work too. Retaining dual citizenship, Tana French holds both Italian and US passports. Now married with a daughter, she currently lives in Dublin where she continues to write to this day. Focusing on crime novels, primarily with her Dublin Murder Squad series, it is her surrounding environment which inspires her.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Remember The Secret History?

French certainly did when she wrote her second book, Likeness, which owes a lot to Donna Tartts ' collegiate classic. The French sophomore outing brings Cassie Maddox back from in Woods into a dicier, less plausible situation. She was recruited to go undercover into a houseful of roommates and impersonate Lexie Madison, who would have been Cassies ' doppelganger if Lexie were dead. There was also an Agatha Christie element to this, since if Lexie had been killed by a housemate, that person should have been very surprised to see her. Likeness checks enough traditional mystery boxes to have been a steady hit with French fans.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Whats Next?

Reading Tana French novel is like walking into a vast and abandoned house: Manderley, say, or Thornfield Hall after Bertha Rochester burn it to ashes. Every page is full of exquisitely telling detail, kind of character notes that should charm your socks off detective who buys himself good suits year in advance before he make Dublins Murder Squad because he just ca wait to get there; undercover officer who eats chicken tikka and tiramisu night before she go into field but youre never able to shake foreboding sense that there is something lurking in shadows, and it is watching you. French write what are usually call literary thrillers, meaning they are less trope-driven than the kinds of commercial thrillers. Her books are sometimes shelved next to little bit more Gillian Flynn than James Patterson. Her literary bona fides have allowed her to appear on New York Timess best books of year lists and in glowing New Yorker essays. And because she also writes the kind of genuinely propulsive thrillers that you can stay up all night reading, she has commercial appeal that has consistently landed her on the New York Timess bestseller list. Now, Starz has adapted her first two books, in Woods and Likeness, into the new TV show Dublin Murders. French fandom is cult, passionately devoted and completist in its attention. The assumption among French fanatics is that once youve read one Tana French book, you have to read the rest of them, and then you have to rank them, best to slightly-less-best. All seven French books are set in Dublin, and six of them form loosely connected Dublin Murder Squad series. Because French first novel came out in 2007, and her most recent in 2018, they form a portrait of Ireland during its Celtic Tiger boom, ensuing crash, and its long, bleak aftermath. That is perhaps part of why, in these books, murder is usually about real estate, which is so precarious, and detectives never stop thinking about class. But the Dublin Murder Squad series isnt detective series in the classic sense. Instead of featuring a static cast of characters solving every case, cast is a daisy chain, with each new book narrated by a supporting character from the previous volume. 2007s in Woods is narrated by one detective; in Likeness, his former partner takes over; in Faithful Place, her former boss becomes narrator; and on it go. That evolving cast allows French to escape from one of the great problems of the detective story: namely, how to make the detective into someone who changes and evolves over time character with genuine character arc while also preserving the status quo enough to allow them to continue building their lives around solving mysteries. French detectives are undone and remade by their cases.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

8. The Trespasser (2016)

T he trend for long-running Crime Fiction series means that half-dozen novels that Tana French has written over the past decade are sometimes catalogue as Dublin Murder Squad Books 1-6. But, although works are sequential, connections between them are unusually tangential for genre. This has become a key part of French distinctive brilliance. Eschewing franchise protagonist, French grants controlling perspective to different Detectives each time. Frank Mackey, main cop in the third book, Faithful Place, is a background character in the fifth title, echoingly named Secret Place; and, in another example of this reprise technique, Franks ' daughter, Holly, nine-year-old witness in the earlier book, becomes a 16-year-old suspect in the latter one. It badge of French talent is that two books featuring Mackeys can be read with enjoyment separately or non-chronologically, but regular readers gain extra level from backstories, as, crucially, do fictional figures, who become laid with memories, secrets and sensitivities in way that real people are. In closest that the French have get to conventional followup, Trespasser allowed second successive case to Detectives Antoinette Conway and Stephen Moran, who investigate killing of a teenage boy within grounds of exclusive girls private school in Secret Place, Book that gold-plat French reputation in both the UK and US. Typically, though, novelists now hand narrative from Moran to Conway, so that partnership is viewed through fresh lens. Conway is unusual among her Murder Squad colleagues in being both woman and non-white, emphasising outsider status already made likely by her loner persona and explosive temper. Perspective change is sometimes startling; story told by Moran makes sensitively little of the Conway race, but she understandably says much more about it herself. Partners are send, apparently on cab-rank principle of next Detectives due job, to the flat where Aislinn Murray, young receptionist, has been found dead, her head smashed against stone fireplace. Burnt dinner in the oven and table laid for two leads to the initial assumption that killing results from lovers row or, in sick-slick cop lingo that fizz through books, boy-beats-girl. Rory Fallon, bashful bookshop owner who was surprised to be admitted to Aislinns affections, becomes the prime suspect, assumed to have thumped her after being dump. The view that it must be Rory is most volubly put by Squad veteran, egotistical smoothie Detective Breslin, who impress on the lead duo virtues of quick solve. But, early on in the long novel, readers know that the solution ca be that simple, and French knows that we know She satisfyingly complicated situation with victims ' involvement in previous police invesigation, and questions about whether Conway and Moran were allot cases for reasons other than roster logic. French novels each adopt a particular sub-theme and technical challenge.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

7. The Secret Place (2014)

Ll books in French's excellent Dublin Murder Squad series have different protagonists, and in this, fifth title, it's turn of Detective Stephen Moran, previously introduced in Faithful Place, to step into the spotlight. Ambitious, working in the Cold Case unit and hoping to graduate to the Murder Squad, Moran gets a surprise visit from Holly Mackey. Holly is the teenage daughter of a colleague and boarder at Kilda's school. She has brought a message She's spotcheck pinned up on eponymous Secret Place, noticeboard where girls may relieve their feelings by anonymously posting their innermost secrets. The photograph of murder victim Chris Harper, 16-year-old heartthrob student from Colm's, neighbouring and equally exclusive boys' school, is accompanied by words I know Who killed him-cut, in the manner of a ransom note, from a book. Moran presents evidence to Antoinette Conway, detective who has been investigating an as-yet-unsolved year-old case, and he is permitted to accompany her to Kilda's to help with the resulting inquiry. Hard-bitten and abrasive, Conway isn't popular with her colleagues, and both she and Moran have a lot to prove. Neither of the detectives, both of whom come from working-class backgrounds, are particularly comfortable with such a bastion of privilege, and the headteacher, Miss McKenna, already unhappy about the damage done to the school's reputation when young Chris was found on grounds with his head bashed in, is less than delighted to see them. Taking place over a single day, with flashbacks to events in the preceding year counting down time to the boy's death, Secret Place is told from the points of view of Moran and Holly and her three friends. The characterisation of girls is particularly strong: all manufactured attitude, intense loyalty, harsh judgment and vying for alpha status with rival clique in a way that only adolescent girls can. Joanne Heffernan, rival clique's queen bee-dealing out casual humiliation even to her acolytes and claiming virtual, if not actual, droit du seigneur over any boy she fancy-is absolute masterpiece of vulnerable cruelty. Here, as in Megan Abbott's Dare Me and Fever, incessant and often vicious jockeying for position is described with such appalling accuracy as to leave this reviewer practically weeping with gratitude that she is no longer a teenager. As well as divides of age and class, French handle gender clashes superbly. These are especially effective between two detectives, and also between Moran and girls, who are busy testing their emergent carnal authority while he tries to unpick a tangle of quarrels and jealousies in order to get to the truth. The claustrophobic, world-within-aworld of boarding-school life is very well render, and French is pitch-perfect on twangy, whiny teenspeak, with plenty of authentic sarky italics and um, hello s, gushy ohmygod s and rising terminals. Less convincing are supernatural touches.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

6. Faithful Place (2010)

T ana French first played a 20-year-old crime in her impressive 2007 debut. In Woods tell story of detective Rob Ryan, whose two best friends disappear at aged 12 while playing in Woods, their bodies never find. Two decades on, child is murdered in the same place and Ryan must confront his past. She does it again with her third novel, Faithful Place, and it's even creepier. Dublin cop Frank Mackey is 19, waiting for his girlfriend, Rosie, and for their midnight escape to London from Liberties, poor area of Dublin where they've grew up. But Rosie never shows and Frank assumes she's changed her mind and is going without him. Desperate to escape from his alcoholic, abusive father and manipulative mother, he left anyway. Twenty years later, he got a phone call from his youngest sister Jackie, only one of his four siblings he still speak to. Rosie's suitcase has been find, and their tickets to London-that she'd never have left behind-are still in it. Suddenly, everything Frank has told himself over the years is thrown into doubt. Darkness, tragedy and danger creep and crawl through this novel, not on a grand scale but on chillingly believable, everyday one. Frank stands in his parents' living room during the wake and realises murderer is present, someone in the room, and it starts to feel underlit and threatening, shadows pile up too thick in corners, as booze continues to flow and mourners keep on singing. He kisses his daughter goodnight and danger is flickering like heat lightning around stuffed toys, filling up that cosy little bedroom like poison gas. He finally asked the right question of the right person and got the wrong answer, and the room went soundless, huge perfect silence like snowfall, as if there had never been noise in the world. It's not crime, or even solving of it, that makes this one of the best thrillers so far this year-there's no serial killer stalking Dublin's streets, no big reveal. It's French's skills as storyteller that make Faithful Place stand out, along with her best creation yet, enjoyably flaw Frank. Here's hoping he-and his chaotic family-show up in future French novels.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

3. Broken Harbor (2012)

What a pretty picture: Irish seaside community of 250 new houses built for lucky, happy families. In evenings, the aroma of home cooking fills the air. Commuters return from work. Gleaming cars fill driveways. Children play in the glow of streetlights. Husbands and wives talk in privacy, because these houses are well build. How could neighbors overhear them through such solid walls? This community, called Brianstown, is at the heart of Tana Frenchs devious, deeply felt psychological chiller Broken Harbor. The place is nothing but a pipe dream. Brianstown is actually a half-build ghost town that bear scant resemblance to its idealized version in sales brochures, a grim monument to the Irish housing boom go bust. Everything about it is dishonest, even the name. The place was called Broken Harbor before somebody decided Brianstown sound better. According to Scorcher Kennedy, novels hard-charging main character, break is derived from breacadh, Gaelic word for dawn. But we know what it really mean. In three earlier books, Ms. French creates haunting, damaged characters who have been hit hard by some cataclysm. Her new book characters are like that too. The Author uses the nifty trick of extracting secondary characters from each book to narrate one that follow. Scorcher appears in Faithful Place as a colleague of its main character, fellow Dublin detective name Frank Mackey. He wore his swagger as part of his El Snazzo suit, Ms. French wrote of Scorcher then. But his bravado is put to test by events break Harbor has in store. Feast your eyes, old son, Scorcher say, blasting his way into the investigation of a very odd and vicious crime. In the middle of night in Brianstown, somebody attacked Jenny and Pat Spain and their two young children. Father and children are dead; Jenny is in no shape to talk to investigators. Scorcher sifts through details of this calamity while ostensibly teaching his smart young partner, Richie Curran, tricks of their trade. This may sound like routine police procedural. But like Gillian Flynns go Girl, this summer's other dagger-sharp display of mind games, Broken Harbor is something more. Its true that Ms. French takes readers to all familiar way stations of murder investigation: forensics, autopsies, serial interrogations and so on. But she has urgent points to make about the social and economic underpinnings of Spain family murders. And she has irresistibly sly ways of toying with readers ' expectations. Take Spain's house decor: place is impeccable except that its walls are full of holes. Clean, dustless holes, not newly punch ones. This detail get mentioned at the beginning of the book. It hovers in the background like something crazy. But Broken Harbor manages to gaze past holes many times, almost casually, before it fully explains what they mean. Then there is the Scorchers family connection to Broken Harbor. This was a seaside resort at which he, his parents and his siblings spend two weeks every year.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

2. The Likeness (2008)

My personal favorite Tana French novel, Likeness, absolutely drips with gothic atmosphere. When a university student is found murdered, Cassie Maddox, Robs ' partner from in Woods, is called innot to investigate, not at first, but because the murdered woman could be her twin. Frank Mackey, her former mentor, asks Cassie to go undercover as Lexie, victim, and embed herself with Lexie's housemates, all of whom are suspects. The tension of Cassies ' attempts to navigate this insular group is exquisite, and as she develops her own individual relationships with suspects, bumping around in isolation in their once-grand House, her sense of self starts to slip, bit by bit. The setting is lush and evocative, and Cassie is a compelling character. Ive see criticism that it is too much to swallow that Cassie and Lexie could pass for one another, but most French novels-hell, most mystery novels in general-require reader to take a leap of faith. It is just a little more central in this story than in some of the others, and if ever there were a book worth suspending your disbelief for, it is this one.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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