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Triglycerides Be Too Low

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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Maybe you 've been eating fast food more often than you should, or you are not getting your recommended two - and - half hours of exercise each week. Or, it could be that you smoke, or your blood pressure is too high. Well, for whatever reason, you may be concerned about your risk of getting heart disease. Well, few tests can help you learn that risk, so you can start making healthy lifestyle changes to reduce it. Coronary risk profile is a group of blood tests that measure your cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Why is it important to know these levels? Because if you have too many of these substances in your blood from eating foods like burgers and French fries, they can clog your arteries. Eventually, your arteries can become so clogged that you 'll have a heart attack or stroke. Men should have their cholesterol test by the time they re 35. Women should have it checked by age 45. If you have condition like diabetes, heart disease, stroke, or high blood pressure, have your cholesterol checked now, no matter what your age. To measure your cholesterol, your doctor will give you a blood test. If you are also having your triglyceride level check, you may be told not to eat or drink anything for 8 to 12 hours before the test. Depending upon your heart risk, doctor may measure just your total cholesterol level, or your total cholesterol along with your LDL, or bad cholesterol, HDL, or good cholesterol, and triglycerides. If you have an average risk of getting heart disease, your goal is to have total cholesterol of less than 200 milligrams per deciliter, LDL cholesterol lower than 130 milligrams per deciliter, HDL cholesterol higher than 40 milligrams per deciliter if you re men or 50 if you re women - higher better, and triglycerides of less than 150 also, lower better. Although some illnesses, like arthritis, can raise your cholesterol level, generally having high cholesterol means that you re at increased risk for heart disease and stroke. It's sign you need to work harder to keep your heart healthy. If your cholesterol levels are normal, that's great! That means that you are eating right, you are exercising, and you are taking good care of your health. You don't need to have another cholesterol test for about five years. But if your cholesterol level is high, or you 've already got heart disease, high blood pressure, or diabetes, you 'll need to have your cholesterol levels checked more often. Keeping close tabs on your cholesterol and triglyceride levels is one way that you can take charge of your health, and change it for the better. High triglyceride levels may be due to: Cirrhosis or liver damage, diet low in protein and high in carbohydrates, Underactive thyroid Nephrotic syndrome, other medicines, such as female hormones, Poorly controlled diabetes Disorder pass down through families in which there are high amounts of cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood. Overall, treatment of elevated triglyceride levels focuses on increased exercise and changes in diet.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Triglyceride level

Your triglycerides are measured when you get Lipid panel, or blood test to check your cholesterol. Triglycerides are simply fat in the blood. Everyone has some triglycerides, AS your body needs them to survive. Your body makes some triglycerides on its own, but others come from food you eat. If they get too high, your risk of heart disease can increase, especially if your good cholesterol is too low. Triglyceride levels are broken down AS follow: normal: Less than 150 mg / dL Borderline High: 150 199 mg / dL High: 200 499 mg / dL Very High: 500 mg / dL or above, when you get your blood test results, your triglycerides will be list. If yours are Borderline High or above, your physician may talk with you about ways you can improve your numbers.


What could cause low triglycerides?

The best treatment for low triglycerides is to find and treat the underlying cause. For some conditions, such as malnutrition, it may be as simple as making dietary changes. For other conditions, such as malabsorption and hyperthyroidism, medication and lifestyle changes may be necessary. If low triglyceride levels are the result of not getting enough fat in diet, here are some suggestions for healthy dietary practices: total dietary fat intake should be anywhere from 20 - 35 percent of total calories for average person not on a low - fat diet. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats should make up the majority of fat consumed in diet, as these are the most heart - healthy. Saturate fats and cholesterol should be limit, and artificial trans fats should never be consume.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Takeaways

Keeping your triglycerides within normal range is relatively easy with a well - round diet. The American Heart Association recommends following dietary and lifestyle changes to keep your heart healthy and your triglyceride levels normal: keep your calories within normal range for your age, gender, and activity level. Eat vary diet that includes all major food groups, especially fruits, vegetables, and Heart - Healthy oils. Avoid overeating foods that contain empty calories, as these can be stored as fat. If youre concerned that your triglyceride levels are low for another reason, such as underlying condition, reach out to your doctor. They can use lipid test, among other medical tests, to find the root cause of your low triglyceride levels.


2. Fats: Choose the right ones

The body needs fat to function correctly, but some fats are more healthy than others. Choosing healthful fats may help reduce triglyceride levels. Solid fats come from meat, full - fat dairy products, and some tropical oils, such as coconut and palm oil. These foods contain trans fats and saturated fats. Trans fats and saturated fats raise triglyceride levels, so people should try to replace them wherever possible. Unsaturated fats, especially polyunsaturated fats, can help lower triglyceride levels. Avocados and olive oil contain monounsaturated fats, also healthy choice. Omega - 3 fats are present in cod liver oil, flaxseeds, and cold - water fish, such as salmon and sardines. People can add PUFAs to their diet by eating these foods.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Controlling High Triglycerides: Medical Treatment

Triglycerides are a type of fat that circulates in the bloodstream. After you eat a snack or meal, your body breaks down fats in food, packages them with protein and cholesterol, and dumps them into the bloodstream. After especially fatty meal, triglycerides can be so abundant that they give blood a milky tint. Within a few hours after meal, triglycerides have mostly cleared out of the bloodstream. The American Heart Association set out four main categories of triglyceride levels: healthy: below 100 milligrams per deciliter of blood borderline high: 150 to 199 mg / dL high: 200 to 499 mg / dL very high: 500 mg / dL and above. High or very high levels of triglycerides are associated with an increased risk of heart disease. When triglyceride levels are near 1 000 mg / dL, individuals can develop pancreatitis, serious inflammation of the pancreas, in addition to heart disease. High triglyceride levels also may be associated with obesity, type 2 Diabetes, and a cluster of heart disease risk factors know as metabolic syndrome. Together, these features put a person at especially high risk of heart disease.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

How to lower them

Women with LDL levels below 70 mg / dL and low triglyceride levels had an increased risk for hemorrhagic stroke, according to a study published in Neurology. Strategies to lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels, like modifying diet or taking statins, are widely used to prevent cardiovascular disease, but our large study shows that in women, very low levels may also carry some risks, Pamela M. Rist, ScD, assistant professor in division of preventive medicine at Brigham and Womens Hospital and Harvard Medical School, say in press release. Women already have a higher risk of stroke than men, in part because they live longer, so clearly defining ways to reduce their risk is important. Researchers analyzed data from 27 937 Patients from the Women's Health Study. Blood samples were taken to measure LDL, HDL, total cholesterol and triglycerides. Women were then categorized by LDL: < 70 mg / dL, 70 mg / dL to 99. 9 mg / dL, 100 mg / dL to 129. 9 mg / dL, 130 mg / dL to 159. 9 mg / dL and 160 mg / dL. Questionnaires were completely annually to collect information on outcomes, including stroke. Follow - up was conducted until first stroke event, loss to follow - up or Study completion, whichever occur first for mean of 19. 3 years. There were 137 incident hemorrhagic strokes during follow - up. Compared with women with LDL levels between 100 mg / dL and 129. 9 mg / dL, those with levels less than 70 mg / dL had 2. 17 times risk for hemorrhagic stroke after multivariable adjustment. Women with LDL levels greater than 160 mg / dL had an elevated risk for hemorrhagic stroke, although it was not statistically significant. An increase in risk for hemorrhagic stroke was not seen in women with LDL levels between 70 mg / dL and 99. 9 mg / dL or between 130 mg / dL and 159. 9 mg / dL. A Significantly increased risk for hemorrhagic stroke was seen in women in the lowest quartile of triglycerides vs. Those in the top quartile after multivariable adjustment. No significant associations were observed between total cholesterol or HDL and risk for hemorrhagic stroke. Women with very low LDL - C or low triglycerides should be monitored for other modifiable risk factors for hemorrhagic stroke, for example, hypertension and smoking, to help reduce their overall risk of experiencing hemorrhagic stroke event, Rist and colleagues write. Additional target research is needed to determine if our finding of elevated LDL - C levels being associated with increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke can be replicated in other cohorts and to provide insights on how to reduce hemorrhagic stroke risk in these individuals. - By Darlene Dobkowski disclosure s: authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Topic Overview

High blood triglycerides are a type of lipid disorder, or dyslipidemia. This condition may occur on its own, with other lipid disorders such as high blood cholesterol or low HDL cholesterol, or as part of metabolic syndrome. Certain medical conditions, genetics, lifestyle habits, and some medicines are all risk factors for high blood triglycerides. Medical conditions that may increase blood triglyceride levels include thyroid disease, diabetes, liver and kidney diseases, and overweight and obesity. Sometimes gene you inherit can cause high blood triglyceride levels. Being physically inactive, eating foods that are high in fat and sugar, or drinking too much alcohol may increase blood triglycerides. Some medicines used to treat breast cancer, high blood pressure, HIV, and other conditions may also increase triglyceride levels in the blood. High blood triglycerides usually do not cause any symptoms. Untreated or uncontrolled high blood triglyceride levels may increase your risk of serious complications such as coronary heart disease and stroke. Very high blood triglycerides can increase the risk of acute pancreatitis, which is inflammation of the pancreas that causes severe pain in the abdomen. Base on your risk factors and your personal and family health histories, your doctor may recommend testing you for high blood triglycerides with a routine blood test called lipid panel. The Lipid panel measures total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels in your blood. Your doctor may diagnose you with high blood triglycerides if your fasting blood triglyceride levels are consistently 150 milligrams per deciliter or higher. Normal fasting blood triglyceride levels are less than 75 mg / dL for children under the age of 10 and less than 90 mg / dL for children aged 10 and older and adults. If you are diagnosed with high blood triglycerides, your doctor may first recommend that you adopt heart - healthy lifestyle changes, such as healthy eating, which includes limiting alcohol, adding sugars, and foods high in saturated or trans fats; getting regular physical activity; quitting smoking; and aiming for healthy weight. Your doctor may also prescribe medicines such as fibrates, omega - 3 fatty acids, nicotinic acid, or statins to control or lower your triglyceride levels.


What are triglycerides?

Triglycerides are composed of glycerol molecules bound to three fatty acids and are digested by pancreatic lipase. Triglycerides are a major component of very - low - density lipoprotein and serve as a source of energy. They are broken down in the intestine, absorbed by intestinal cells, and combined with cholesterol and proteins to form chylomicrons that are transported in lymph to the bloodstream. Triglycerides are measured using enzymatic reagents, including lipase, glycerol kinase, and glycerol - 3phosphate oxidase linked to the peroxidase - chromogen detection system. Triglycerides comprise three fatty acids esterify with glycerol backbone. Triacylglycerols is the correct chemical name, but they are more commonly known as triglycerides and this term will be used throughout this chapter. Triglycerides are major dietary fat. They are hydrolyse in the gut by lipases to fatty acids and monoglycerides. Monoglycerides undergo re - esterification in enterocytes and subsequent incorporation into chylomicrons. Major sites of endogenous triglyceride synthesis are liver and adipose tissue. In normal circumstances, hepatic triglyceride is secreted in very low density lipoproteins. In certain pathological states, triglycerides accumulate in hepatocytes, leading to hepatic steatosis. Adipose tissue triglycerides represent the major energy store of the body. Fatty acids are mobilized from adipose tissue triglycerides by action of hormone - sensitive lipase, which is activated by glucagon and adrenaline and inhibited by insulin.


Cause

The most common causes of high triglycerides are obesity and poorly controlled diabetes. If you are overweight and are not active, you may have high triglycerides, especially if you eat a lot of carbohydrates or sugary foods or drink a lot of alcohol. Binge drinking of alcohol can cause dangerous spikes in triglyceride levels that can trigger inflammation of the pancreas. Other causes of high triglycerides include hypothyroidism, kidney disease, and certain inherited lipid disorders. Estrogen therapy, which may be used for menopause symptoms, may also raise triglyceride levels. Certain medicines may also raise triglycerides. These medicines include: tamoxifen. Steroids. Beta - blockers. Diuretics. Birth control pills. High triglycerides rarely occur on their own. They are usually associated with other conditions. High triglycerides are part of metabolic syndrome, group of medical problems that increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, and diabetes. Metabolic syndrome include: high triglycerides. Low HDL cholesterol. High blood pressure. High blood sugar. Too much fat, especially around the waist.


Symptoms

High triglycerides by themselves do not cause symptoms. If your high triglycerides are caused by a genetic condition, you may have visible fatty deposits under skin called xanthomas. In rare cases, people who have very high triglyceride levels may develop inflammation of the pancreas, which can cause sudden, severe abdominal pain, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, and fever. If you have high triglycerides, you may also have high cholesterol. In many cases, people don't know that they have high triglycerides until they have a blood test called lipoprotein analysis to check their cholesterol levels. If your triglyceride levels are high, your doctor will also check for and treat other associated conditions that may be linked to high triglycerides. These conditions include diabetes, hypothyroidism, kidney disease, and metabolic syndrome.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Cause

Genetic variations can be responsible for lower blood triglyceride levels, including: studies have found that genetic variations in LPL gene, responsible for low blood triglycerides, were associated with decreased risk of all - cause death and lower risk for heart disease. Mutations in the ANGPTL4 gene and APOC3 gene have been associated with lower blood triglyceride levels. In 595 healthy Taiwanese, people with the APOE genetic variant had significantly lower blood triglycerides. In 80k Icelanders, variant of the ASGR1 gene was associated with low blood triglycerides. Genetic variation in LPL gene was associated with lower triglyceride blood levels in 162 African - Americans and 66 Hispanics.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What is cholesterol?

Anyone age 19 or younger:

Type of CholesterolHealthy Level
Total CholesterolLess than 170mg/dL
Non-HDLLess than 120mg/dL
LDLLess than 100mg/dL
HDLMore than 45mg/dL

Vldl stands for very - low - density lipoprotein. Your liver makes VLDL and releases it into your bloodstream. Vldl particles mainly carry triglycerides, another type of fat, to your tissues. Vldl is similar to LDL cholesterol, but LDL mainly carries cholesterol to your tissues instead of triglycerides. Vldl and LDL are sometimes called bad cholesterol because they can contribute to the buildup of plaque in your arteries. This buildup is called atherosclerosis. Plaque that builds up is a sticky substance made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood. Over time, plaque hardens and narrows your arteries. This limits the flow of oxygen - rich blood to your body. It can lead to coronary artery disease and other heart diseases.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

Men age 20 or older:

Type of CholesterolHealthy Level
Total Cholesterol125 to 200mg/dL
Non-HDLLess than 130mg/dL
LDLLess than 100mg/dL
HDL40mg/dL or higher

Women age 20 or older:

Type of CholesterolHealthy Level
Total Cholesterol125 to 200mg/dL
Non-HDLLess than 130mg/dL
LDLLess than 100mg/dL
HDL50mg/dL or higher
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What are the normal ranges?

Anyone age 19 or younger:

Type of CholesterolHealthy Level
Total CholesterolLess than 170mg/dL
Non-HDLLess than 120mg/dL
LDLLess than 100mg/dL
HDLMore than 45mg/dL

The most common blood test used to check your triglyceride levels is called lipid panel. A standard lipid panel will test the following: total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides cholesterol / HDL ratio non - HDL cholesterol. Your doctor will use a lipid panel to determine if your triglyceride levels are within normal range. Normal triglyceride levels are < 150 mg / dL. Triglyceride levels between 150 and 199 mg / dL are borderline high. High triglyceride levels occur at 200 - 499 mg / dL. Anything over 500 mg / dL is considered very high. There is no current range for low triglyceride levels. However, if your triglyceride levels are very low, this may indicate an underlying condition or disease.


What are triglycerides?

Aim for at least 30 minutes of physical activity on most or all days of the week. Regular exercise can lower triglycerides and boost good cholesterol. Try to incorporate more physical activity into your daily tasks. For example, climbing stairs at work or taking walk during breaks. Avoid sugar and refine carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates, such as sugar and foods made with white flour or fructose, can increase triglycerides. Lose weight. If you have mild to moderate hypertriglyceridemia, focus on cutting calories. Extra calories are converted to triglycerides and stored as fat. Reducing your calories will reduce triglycerides. Choose healthier fats. Trade saturated fat found in meats for healthier fat found in plants, such as olive and canola oils. Instead of red meat, try fish high in omega - 3 fatty acids such as mackerel or salmon. Avoid trans fats or foods with hydrogenate oils or fats. Limit how much alcohol you drink. Alcohol is high in calories and sugar and has a particularly potent effect on triglycerides. If you have severe hypertriglyceridemia, avoid drinking any alcohol.


What is cholesterol?

A variety of things can affect cholesterol levels. These are some things you can do to lower your cholesterol levels: diet. Saturate fat and cholesterol in food you eat makes your blood cholesterol level rise. Saturate fat is the main problem, but cholesterol in foods also matters. Reducing the amount of saturated fat in your diet helps lower your blood cholesterol level. Foods that have high levels of saturated fats include some meats, dairy products, chocolate, baked goods, and deep - fried and processed foods. Weight. Being overweight is a risk factor for heart disease. It also tends to increase your cholesterol. Losing weight can help lower your LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. It also raises your HDL cholesterol level. Physical Activity. Not being physically active is a risk factor for heart disease. Regular physical activity can help lower LDL cholesterol and raise HDL cholesterol levels. It also helps you lose weight. You should try to be physically active for 30 minutes on most, if not all, days. Smoking. Cigarette smoking lowers your HDL cholesterol. Hdl helps to remove bad cholesterol from your arteries. So lower HDL can contribute to higher level of bad cholesterol. Things outside of your control that can also affect cholesterol levels include: age and sex. As women and men get older, their cholesterol levels rise. Before the age of menopause, women had lower total cholesterol levels than men of the same age. After the age of menopause, women's LDL cholesterol levels tend to rise. Heredity. Your genes partly determine how much cholesterol your body make. High blood cholesterol can run in families. Race. Certain races may have increased risk of high blood cholesterol. For example, African Americans typically have higher HDL and LDL cholesterol levels than whites.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

Men age 20 or older:

Type of CholesterolHealthy Level
Total Cholesterol125 to 200mg/dL
Non-HDLLess than 130mg/dL
LDLLess than 100mg/dL
HDL40mg/dL or higher

Women age 20 or older:

Type of CholesterolHealthy Level
Total Cholesterol125 to 200mg/dL
Non-HDLLess than 130mg/dL
LDLLess than 100mg/dL
HDL50mg/dL or higher
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What could cause low triglycerides?

Anyone age 19 or younger:

Type of CholesterolHealthy Level
Total CholesterolLess than 170mg/dL
Non-HDLLess than 120mg/dL
LDLLess than 100mg/dL
HDLMore than 45mg/dL

The 5 - year survival rate for chronic heart failure remains at 50%, with mortality rates higher for men than for women. After diagnosis with heart failure, women tend to have better prognosis and to survive longer than men. 1 gives greater life expectancy for women in the developed world, overall impact of heart failure is still very important for them. 2 Although the CHF death rate seems to be lower or same in women, most available scientific evidence regarding the influence of male versus female sex on prognosis of CHF patients derives from observational studies and retrospective analyses, and women are known to be underrepresented in clinical trials. 3 These studies report divergent findings concerning prognosis of CHF patients according to sex, mainly attributable to study characteristics, cause of heart failure, and type of population study. 2 4 - 6 Few reports deal with differences between men and women in specialized heart failure clinics or units. Chronic heart failure can lead to catabolic state and eventually to cachexia in advanced cases. There is preferential loss of fat but also a decline in lean body mass. Reduced efficiency of adenosine triphosphate production by mitochondria, reduced appetite, malabsorption, and reduced levels of anabolic steroids might play role. 7 Patients with advanced heart failure have severe symptoms, high mortality rate, and low cholesterol level. 8 This can be due to inflammation, endotoxins, adrenergic activation, oxidative stress, tissue injury, and cachexia. 9 10 liver - function abnormalities are most commonly seen in patients with low cardiac indices and resolve with compensation of heart failure; they are not associated with clinically apparent hepatic Disease. 11 It has been determined that liver dysfunction is frequent in CHF and is characterized by predominantly cholestatic enzyme profile that worsens with disease severity. 12 Functional liver mass was significantly decreased in New York Heart Association Functional class IV Patients, in comparison with NYHA II and III Patients and with subjects in the Control group. Functional liver mass in patients with systolic CHF does not show any correlation with left ventricular ejection fraction, but it does correlate strongly with left atrial diameter. 13 Dysfunction of liver during Heart failure syndrome can be another explanation for decreased cholesterol level in CHF. Triglycerides are neutral lipids consisting of glycerol backbone and 3 long - chain fatty acids. These molecules are major sources of stored energy in such diverse tissues AS adipose tissue and skeletal muscle, and they are integral components of lipoprotein particles synthesize by liver and small intestine. 14 in advanced heart failure, mechanisms similar to those that cause low cholesterol levels might cause low triglyceride levels. It seems that heart failure might alter both the production and storage of triglycerides. Loss of major energy source can adversely affect survival of patients with CHF. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic significance of triglyceride levels for both men and women who have CHF.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

Men age 20 or older:

Type of CholesterolHealthy Level
Total Cholesterol125 to 200mg/dL
Non-HDLLess than 130mg/dL
LDLLess than 100mg/dL
HDL40mg/dL or higher

Women age 20 or older:

Type of CholesterolHealthy Level
Total Cholesterol125 to 200mg/dL
Non-HDLLess than 130mg/dL
LDLLess than 100mg/dL
HDL50mg/dL or higher
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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