Advanced searches left 3/3
Search only database of 8 mil and more summaries

Tv Game Shows

Summarized by PlexPage
Last Updated: 20 October 2020

* If you want to update the article please login/register

General | Latest Info

There's something about game shows that continue to entertain and captivate television audiences. They re first form of reality TV and so much fun to play at home where there is no pressure or studio audience. No matter how goofy the premise or wacky the contestants, game shows remain a TV staple and something we can count on as viewers. Who wants to be Millionaire debuted 20 years ago on August 16, so in honor of that anniversary, here is a ranking of the Top 25 game shows of all time. It's popular game show in which contestants, or challengers, are questioned by a panel of celebrities, to see which one is actually telling the truth about their identity or occupation, though, only a real person is obligated to tell the truth. Beginning in the mid - 1950s, to Tell Truth Run regularly until late 1970s and has since popped up in various forms. Beginning in 1969, sale of Century saw three hosts during its lengthy run, including baseball great Joe Garagiola. Contestants earn money by answering trivia - style questions and have a chance to grab an instant bargain along the way to the final round. Who can forget famous game? Winners also have a chance to take a quick prize or bank money, play on and see if they can win more cash to buy more prizes. A game where knowledge is king and lady luck is queen. The Card - themed Game Show, created and originally hosted by Jack Barry, features players pulling slot - machine arm to see what categories they could choose to answer questions from and accumulate cash. The joker, meanwhile, served as wild card and was quite menacing looking. In recent years, Snoop Dogg hosted a revival version, which makes complete sense. Staples of the genre, Jim Perry and Bob Eubanks, were just two of the hosts during Game's heyday. Two competitors work off a deck of 52 seemingly life - size cards and answer questions to gain control of cards playing high - low format and ultimately win as much money as possible. The game was hardly innovative, but it was quality entertainment while lying on the couch when home sick from school. When the US version of this hit Game Show debuted on Aug. 16 1999, it took the country by storm and became appointment viewing. With Regis Philbin as its original host, show captivated fans with its intense quest to win $1 million through progression of questions. From lifelines, to phone - afriend to Regis unique humor, millions around the globe were picking up their phones and later heading to the internet to try their chances at being contestants. It's tic - tac - toe with celebrities sitting in Squares Center Square being the most prestigious and contestants have to guess whether celebs are telling the truth or lying. Peter Marshall, John Davidson and Tom Bergeron are a few prominent names to host.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What is AT&T TV?

Culver CITY, Calif. Glance around jeopardy! Set during rehearsals for its first - ever team championship, it's easy to be intimidated by assembled brain power. There's Brad Rutter, whose overall jeopardy! Haul, $4. 3 million, is the most won on any game show. And Ken Jennings, 74 - game winner and top moneymaker, with $2. 5 million, in non - Tournament jeopardy! Competition. And Buzzy Cohen, reigning Tournament of Champions winner. Anchorage, Alaska Game Show Price Is Right has changed its policy on not shipping Alaska contestants ' winnings beyond ANCHORAGE after Bethel nurse was going to have to pay thousands of dollars to have her prizes shipped home. An email Friday from FremantleMedia North America, production company behind Price Is Right, said Joni Beckham's prizes would indeed be delivered to her home in Bethel, KTVA - TV report. Los ANGELES ' current TV funny Lady, vintage one and time - honor Christmas movie, won over viewers in the run - up to the holiday. Preview of Ellen DeGeneres NEW NBC prime - time Game Show, Ellen's Game of Games, and cbs pair of i Love Lucy episodes starring Lucille Ball landed in the Top 20 last week, Nielsen said Wednesday. Christmas Eve broadcast of It's Wonderful Life on NBC was the week's Top - rat holiday movie. Look at what's happening all around majors today: year after the All - Star Game drew its lowest TV rating ever, Major League Baseball will see how this telecast fare. Fox try few new things: Bryce Harper and George Springer wear microphones while playing outfield and banter with broadcasters, and leadoff men Jose Altuve and Charlie Blackmon do interviews just seconds before they step into the batter's box. Los ANGELES Ellen DeGeneres Show won Daytime Emmy Award for best TV TV TV entertainment talk Show Sunday, 20 years to the day that her character came out as gay on sitcom Ellen. She did it because it was the right thing to do, said Mary Connelly, Ellen's executive producer, of DeGeneres ' decision to be open about her sexuality and do the same for her character in 1997. Degeneres was absent and Connelly accepted the award. New YORK Love Connection is reconnecting with viewers. A new version of match - making Game Show will air on Fox starting May 25, network announce. The one - hour series will amp up the original dating show for today's audiences, featuring single men and women looking for romance. Its host is Andy Cohen, of Bravo's Watch What Happen Live, who will bring his personal brand of audacious fun to the series, Fox said on Wednesday. New YORK Love Connection is reconnecting with viewers. A new version of match - making Game Show will air on Fox starting May 25, network announced Thursday. The one - hour series will amp up the original dating show for today's audiences, featuring single men and women looking for romance. Its host is Andy Cohen, of Bravo's Watch What Happen Live, who will bring his personal brand of audacious fun to the series, Fox say.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Twenty-One

Table

GameValue
1$100,000
2$200,000
3$300,000
4$400,000

As the extent of QUIZ SHOW's deception was reveal, networks pulled all their high - stakes Game SHOW from the air, replacing them with westerns and detective shows. But scandals affect far more than prime - TIME line - up of television programs. People's careers were ruin, reputations were scar, and the way television would do business with its sponsors would change forever. In the aftermath of the scandals, numerous former contestants sued producers, networks, and program sponsors, arguing that scandals had defamed them and cost them money. Doll Goostree, one of several $64 000 question program contestants, sued the SHOW's producers and CBS. She wanted to recoup $4 000 she might have won if her match was not rigged and to be deprived of opportunity to win even larger cash prizes. In his book about the scandal, Prime TIME and Misdemeanors, Manhattan Assistant District Attorney Joseph Stone maintained that those who had brought lawsuits were unusual in that instead of losing money, they had been deprived of getting MORE of it. Law turns out to be less generous than QUIZ SHOW sponsors: no judges decide in favor of contestants. The true victims were not contestants, Stone writes, many of whom make money, but television viewers hoodwinked into believing that the fiction they were watching was actually real - life drama. But even television viewers seem not to mind. A Straw poll conducted by TIME by Miami Herald shows that the public was not outraged by QUIZ hoaxes. Most Miamians want the shows back, regardless of all that has taken place. Everything on TV is somewhat of lie, One such individual explained to the Herald, but it's still entertainment. No one involved in a scandal suffers serious legal consequences. None of the contestants or behind - scenes coaches were punished for their participation in duplicity that became one of the top ten news stories of the year. The District Attorney estimated that at least 100 contestants who had testified had perjured themselves. A handful plead guilty to charges of second degree perjury in Special Sessions Court in New York, admitting they had lied to a grand jury investigating a hoax. All, however, draw suspended sentences. Changes followed inside the television industry. Producers such as Jack Barry and Dan Enright of Twenty - One were blacklisted by industry for some time, yet they too were spar any legal repercussions. Their behind - scenes manipulations had break no laws. In TIME, even they would return to prime - TIME. The scandal triggered amendments passed to the Communications Act in 1960. One amendment makes it illegal for outcomes of any contests of skill or knowledge, including QUIZ shows, to be put forward in any way that was pre - arrange. Another amendment requires stations to make it clear on air when money or other consideration has been received for broadcast material. This truth - in - advertising requirement hints at a fundamental shift in the relationship between content producers and advertisers.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

Table2

GameValue
1$25,000
2$50,000
3$100,000
4$250,000
5$500,000
6$750,000
7$1,000,000
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Password

Here's how the money ladder went:

LevelGoalPrize
15 out of 10$10,000
25 out of 9$25,000 (Safety Net/Guarantee)
35 out of 8$50,000
45 out of 7$100,000
55 out of 6$250,000 (Safety Net/Guarantee during season 2)
6All five words$1,000,000 (Grand Prize Jackpot)

In original from 1961 until 1974, two teams of two played Password for points. One player from each team was given a Password while home viewers saw word on their screens. Then clue givers give one - word clues to get their partners to say password. In the ABC version, first team get option to pass or play. Teams alternate turns until one guesser says Password, which gives team points according to how many clues they give, starting at 10 and ending with 1. Should guesser on the team in control say form of password, guesser gets one last chance to say the exact word. Whenever illegal clue is give, buzzer sound, and the guesser loses the chance to guess Password, and giving away Password by clue givers End word. Decisions as to whether clues were good or bad were made by word authorities in the CBS version, authorities were Professor David H. Greene, Professor from New York University, and World Book Encyclopedia Dictionary editor Dr. Reason. Goodwin. On ABC, authorities were Dr. Robert Stockwell from UCLA and Carolyn Duncan. Partners on both teams alternate between giving & receiving, starting with stars, then to contestants; Plus, team that trail or lose last Password start new Password. The first team to reach 25 points won the game and went on to play the Lightning Round. By end of the ABC run, game was play best of three. In Lightning Round, celebrity on the winning team had 60 seconds to get his / her partner to say five more passwords. If the contestant can't guess the password, celebrity can pass. Each password guess was worth $50, meaning that contestant could win up to $250. In the ABC version, after the main Lightning Round, winning contestant can bet any or all of his / her winnings on one more Password call betting word in which the contestant now gives clues to his celebrity partner for the next 15 seconds. Later in ABC's run, value per word was up to $100 for a possible total of $500. On CBS daytime version, contestants play 2 games, win or lose, with each game worth $100. Originally, in the nighttime version, 2 players stay for the entire show. Starting that November, two new contestants play one game each, with winners receiving $250 and losers receiving $50. On the ABC version, champions can stay until they are defeated or they win ten games. Later on, limit was drop. In 1965, show adopted the annual Tournament of Champions where contestants in the daytime version who won both their games were invited back to compete for more money. Every three months, four top winners during that period would return for quarterly contest.


Main Game

Two teams of two, play game which was now in a Pyramid - like format. Each team had 30 seconds to correctly guess five passwords, with each one scoring one point. On each word, clue giver could give as many one word clues as possible, but they had to wait for the guesser to answer; otherwise the word would be disqualify. As soon as the guesser correctly guesses the word or if the giver pass, team would move on to the next word. Celebrities give clues in the first round, and contestants give clues in the second round. The game was played in two halves, and after the first half, contestants switched partners for the final half. After the second half, team with the most points go on to play the Million Dollar Password round. If there was a tie at the end of the fourth round, teams played tie - breaker in Classic Password mode. In the Classic Password tie - breaker, teams alternate turns with contestants giving and celebrities receiving until one team gets Password and wins the game.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

The Price Is Right

For the first week, the games were:

Day of the WeekPricing GamePrizeActual Retail PriceOutcome
MondayTemptationPorsche 911 Carrera$92,475Bailout
TuesdayHole in One (or Two)BMW 640i$87,516Won
WednesdayGolden RoadMercedes-Benz SL550$114,000+Lost
ThursdayLucky $evenJaguar XK$86,453Lost
Friday3 StrikesAudi R8 V8 Quattro$146,923Lost

One Bid is a qualifying game, played with four contestants standing at the foot of the stage. A Prize is shown and each player Give Bid For item. Contestants bid in dollars and not cents and may not bid the same amount as any player bid previously for that item. The contestant who bid closest to the actual retail price of prize, without Going Over, wins prize and advances on to stage for individual pricing game. Contestants that bid the exact price also receive a cash bonus. If all four contestants overbid, they all must bid again, lower than lowest bid. Four initial contestants are chosen from the audience at the start of the show to play the first One Bid round and bid in order from left to right; before each subsequent One Bid round, new contestant is chosen from the audience to replace the previous winner. When Price Is Right started as a half - hour show, all four podiums were orange and contestants ' bids were in egg - crate displays, with Goodson - Todman asterisk on left to indicate the winning bid. Starting in 1975, just before Price Is Right expanded to hour, podiums appeared in different colors and in this order: red, green, orange and sky blue; plus bids were / are now in sports - type display. The Colors of second and fourth podiums Switch in 1981. Starting from the airdate of January 30 2002 in Daytime Series and 30 Anniversary Special, color of the second podium changed from sky blue to blue; starting with the airdate of January 31 2003 in Daytime Series and with the first Million Dollar Spectacular, color of the third podium changed from orange to yellow and has stay there ever since. For Seasons 36 - 37, colors all become brighter screen from the previous normal screen. Since Season 38, Contestants Row is Make up of LCD monitors, but the familiar SportsType display remain; plus, screens can now hold five Digits and also brighter colors have Change back to Its normal colors. Starting in Season 40, frame borders around displays were remove. Also, on special shows, special animations and symbols are showing on monitors in place of regular colors; when bids are enter, animation / symbol is remove, revealing each podium's normal colors. Each winner of six One Bid rounds is called onto stage to play a pricing game to play for 1 prize, multiple prizes valued at least several thousand dollars, or cash prize. Here is a list of all prices games play on Price Is Right. Any Number Balance Game Bargain Game Bonkers Bonus Game Bullseye Card Game Check Game + Check - Out Cliff Hangers Clock Game Coming or Going Cover Up Danger Price Dice Game do Math Double Cross Double Prices Easy as 1 2 3 5 Price Tags Flip Flop Freeze Frame Gas Money Golden Road Grand Game Gridlock!


1950s-1960s Version Gameplay

In the original version of Price Is Right, four contestants - one returning champion, other three choose from the studio audience - Bid on items or ensembles of items in auction - style format. A prize WAS present for contestants to bid on. Minimum Bid WAS specify. After the opening bid, contestants bid on item in turn, with each successive bid a certain amount higher than the previous bid. The contestant could freeze his / her current bid instead of increasing it if he / she believes his / her bid WAS close enough to win. Later rule allows contestants, on their opening bid only, to underbid other bids, but this automatically freezes their bid and prevents them from later increasing their original bid. Some rounds were designated as One - Bid round, where only one round of bidding WAS hold; sometimes minimum - bid and higher - bid threshold rules were also waive. Bidding continued until the buzzer sound, at which point each contestant who had not yet frozen WAS given one final bid. Bidding also ended when three of contestants had freeze, at which point the fourth contestant WAS allowed one final bid unless he / she already had high bid. Cullen then read the actual retail price of price contestant whose bid WAS closest without going over the actual price of won item. If everyone overbid, prize WAS not be won; However, Cullen sometimes had overbids erased and instructed players to give lower bids before reading the actual price. Frequently, bell rang after the winner WAS reveal, indicating bonus prize accompany item up for bids. While this WAS typically ADDITIONAL prize, bonus games often accompany the prize. After set number of rounds, contestant who accumulates the highest value in cash and prizes becomes champion and returns to the next show.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

For the second week, the games were:

Day of the WeekPricing GamePrizeActual Retail PriceOutcome
MondayLucky $evenPorsche Cayenne$57,465Won
TuesdayCard GameRange Rover Sport SE$66,225Lost
WednesdaySwitcherooMaserati Quattroporte SQ4$109,430Lost
ThursdayOne AwayTesla Model S$79,320Won
FridayThat's Too Much!Aston Martin V8 Vantage RWD$145,810Lost

Table

Days of the WeekCelebritiesCharitiesTotal Amount Won
MondaySnoop DoggSnoop Youth Football League$72,585
TuesdayJenny McCarthyGeneration Rescue$45,607
WednesdayNeil Patrick HarrisThe Noreen Fraser Foundation$65,238.40
ThursdayChris DaughtryAlzheimer's Association$22,070
FridayHeidi KlumUnicef$30,034

Table2

Days of the WeekCelebritiesCharitiesTotal Amount Won
MondayNick Lachey Drew LacheyCamp Joy$62,688
TuesdayNeNe LeakesSaving Our Daughters$77,714
WednesdaySharon OsbourneThe Sharon Osbourne Colon Cancer Program$62,793
ThursdayCharles BarkleyThe Mustard Seed School$67,633
FridayDemi LovatoFree the Children$48,532

Table3

Days of the WeekCelebritiesCharitiesTotal Amount Won
MondayJack BlackSociety of Women Engineers$73,513
TuesdayWilmer ValderramaVoto Latino$83,596
WednesdayJane LynchDirect Relief$49,112
ThursdayJulie BowenPlanned Parenthood$44,228
FridayChris O'DonnellRedF$41,739.32

Table4

Day of the WeekPricing GamePrizeActual Retail PriceOutcome
MondaySpelling BeeAston Martin Vantage$120,265Won
TuesdayMore or LessMaserati Quattroporte SN/ALost
WednesdayCover UpPorsche Panamera Edition$84,731Lost
ThursdayLucky $evenTesla Model S 70$82,295Lost
FridayGolden RoadMercedes-Benz S550 4MATIC Coupe$139,142Won

Table5

Day of the WeekPricing GamePrizeActual Retail PriceOutcome
MondayCliff HangersJaguar F-Type$71,948Won
TuesdayPocket ChangePorche 718 Boxster$65,924Lost
WednesdayThat's Too Much!Tesla Model 3 Long Range$51,700Won
Thursday5 Price TagsRange Rover Velar R-Dynamic$66,715Lost
Friday3 StrikesMaserati Ghibli$79,642Lost

Table6

Day of the WeekPricing GamePrizeActual Retail PriceOutcome
MondayAny NumberMaserati Ghibli$81,362Lost
TuesdayGolden RoadPorche 911$123,000+Lost
WednesdaySpelling BeeLexus LC500$100,114Bailout
Thursday5 Price TagsLincoln Navigator$79,545Won
FridayOne AwayChevy Corvette$60,795Lost

Table7

GameDay DateOutcome
Car PongMonday, May 9, 2016$500 (Won)
Go For a SpinTuesday, May 10, 2016Lost
Gold RushWednesday, May 11, 2016Lost
AcceleratorThursday, May 12, 2016Car Won
Smash for CashFriday, May 13, 2016Lost

Table8

GameDay DateOutcome
Car PongMonday, November 18, 2019$1,750 (Won)
Smash for CashTuesday, November 19, 2019$5,000 (Bailout)
AcceleratorWednesday, November 20, 2019$1,700 (Won)
Gold RushThursday, November 21, 2019Lost
Go For a SpinFriday, November 22, 2019$500 (Won)
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

History

55 - year - old show that commands 23 million viewers and is the top - rat Game Show in history. The Answer is: What Is Jeopardy!? In 1964, the first show Make its debut. But if it was not for a group of popularand fraudulentquiz shows, it may never have existed in the first place. Throughout the late 1950s, viewers were rivet by a series of scandals related to TV Quiz Shows. High - stakes games were extremely popular extremely rig. Once the nation realized they were rooting for contestants in televised frauds, grand jury, congressional investigation, and even change in communications laws follow. But though the shows were short - live, their format lives on in Jeopardy!. Game shows were born right around dawn of television, but first became popular on the Radio. In 1938, Information Please, Radio Show that rewarded listeners for submitting questions that stump expert panel, debut. Later that year, TV first Game Show, Spelling Bee, appear. The format really Take off after World War II, as MORE households get TVs. Low - stakes Show like this Is Missus, which had contestants participate in silly contests, and Queen For Day, which rewards women for sharing their sob stories, reels in daytime viewers. But it takes Supreme Court suit to usher in big prizes for shows. In 1954, Supreme Court ruled in FCC v. American Broadcasting Co., Inc. That giveaways were gambling. This decision paves the way for higher stakes in game shows. Suddenly, prime - time viewers could choose between a new rash of game shows with massive prizes. The First Popular high - stakes Show, $64 000 Question, created by CBS producer Louis Cowan and based on older Radio Show, Take It or Leave It, pays winners of a riveting general - Knowledge Quiz equivalent of over $600 000 in modern dollars if they could beat out experts in their own fields. It was an immediate hit, and so were its most frequent winners. Soon, another show, Twenty - One, reeled in NBC viewers by pitting two players against one another in a trivia game that involves isolation booths and headphones. Shows were popular because of their tense gameplay and gimmicks like audience close - ups, lighting that emphasized lone contestant thinking, and isolation booths, writes media historian Olaf Hoerschelmann. They transform people who were not celebrities or recognized experts in their field into superstars, he note. The nation fell in love with contestants like the Joyce Brothers. In 1955 and 1957, psychologist won top prize in the $64 000 Question and its successor, beating a panel of actual boxers on obscure questions about sport. The brothers knew that her chances of getting selected for the show were higher if she could compete as a novelty contestant, so she gained encyclopedic knowledge of sportliterallyby reading 20 volumes of encyclopedia on boxing. Her wins turned her into a household name, and soon she had her own TV Show and was on her way to becoming one of the most influential Pop psychologists of all time.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

22. 'Love Connection'

Love Connection, hosted by Chuck Woolery from 1983 to 1994, takes Dating Game step further. After the contestant chooses their dream date, both parties get to return to the show to describe how things are go. In the end, they had the option of going out again or never setting eyes on one another for the rest of their lives. It's no surprise that bad dates make for far more entertaining shows. Fox will bring back the series on May 25 with Andy Cohen, above, serving as host. Another new wrinkle to update: Same - sex couples are now feature,

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

20. 'Deal or No Deal'

Table

Round 16 cases to open
Round 25 cases to open
Round 34 cases to open
Round 43 cases to open
Round 52 cases to open
Rounds 6-91 case to open

Contestants face series of numbered silver briefcases, each holding money amounts from 1 to top PRIZE. The contestant is instructed to pick one case for them to keep and has to eliminate others, realizing that whatever amount is in the case they open cannot be in the case they pick at the outset. Each round progressively removes fewer cases from the game, diminishing subsequently until final rounds require removal of one case at a time. After eliminating a certain number of cases, Howie and contestant receive a phone call from a mysterious banker offering money amount based on which amounts are still on board. Banker's goal is to prevent contestants from winning as much money as possible. If smaller amounts on the left side are eliminate, offers will go up; likewise, if larger amounts on the right side are eliminate, offers will go down. Howie opens a clear Plexiglas flip - top box on the contestant's podium, exposing a large flashing - Red electronic button; if the contestant accepts the deal, he / she presses the button to end the game and win the amount of deal, otherwise, contestant declares " No Deal! Contestant closes flip - top box, requiring contestant to continue into the next round of game. If contestant Take Deal, they go ahead and play out the remainder of their game just for fun to see what would happen if they say No Deal and play on for real. If the contestant rejects the final offer of Game, he or she goes home with the amount that was present in their case. During the show's original primetime run from 2005 to 2009, contestants were allowed to swap cases; this rule was removed for the Syndicated version. 26 cases are held by 26 models with money amounts ranging from 1 to $1 000 000. The first round begins with six cases to be remove, second round with five more, then four, three, two, and subsequently down to removing one case at a time. When two cases are leave, contestant has the choice of switching their case for one remaining on stage. Occasionally, deals offer extravagant prizes in addition to cash. The new feature for the CNBC version is the ability, once per game, for players to counteroffer banker.S If the banker refuses to counteroffer, contestant is forced to continue to the next round. However, if the banker accepts the counteroffer, game automatically end. Contestants were chosen via Deal Wheel spun by primetime models Patricia Kara and Tameka Jacobs. The wheel had 22 spaces on it models spin wheel and drop ball as it spin. Wherever the ball lands, player holding a case with that number will play the game.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

Table2

$.01$1,000
$1$2,500
$5$5,000
$10$7,500
$25$10,000
$50$25,000
$100$50,000
$200$75,000
$300$100,000
$400$250,000
$500$500,000

Table3

Rounds 1-25 cases to open
Round 34 cases to open
Rounds 4-52 cases to open
Rounds 6-71 case to open

Table4

$.02$2,000
$2$5,000
$10$10,000
$20$15,000
$50$20,000
$100$50,000
$200$100,000
$400$150,000
$600$200,000
$800$500,000
$1,000$1,000,000
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

18. 'I've Got a Secret'

Bill, one - time panelist, becomes emcee for this blink - and - you - miss - it revival of one of TV's favorite panel games. Just like the original show, contestant, or several contestants, come onstage, whisper their Secret to Bill, and answer the panel's yes - or - no questions. Each panelist had a turn, and the game continued until somebody guessed the secret, or until all four panelists turned up. This is one of the only game shows that was really was just a game. There was no prize money award. As on original series, celebrity guests drop by with Secret for panel on each show. The first two shows were shot at CBS Broadcast Center on September 28 1975, almost nine months before they air. These two shows serve as pilots, and the panel consists of Elaine Joyce, Richard Dawson, Pat Collins and Henry Morgan. Drummer Buddy Rich was a special guest for the first show that air, Rodney Dangerfield for the second. Two additional shows were shot at Ed Sullivan Theater on June 18 1976. Phyllis George replaced Elaine Joyce for those two shows, and special guests were Charles Nelson Reilly and Loretta Swit. Buddy Rich's secret was that he played drums while hanging upside down. Rodney Dangerfield introduced a musician whose instrument was his own head, and another who played his hands. Charles Nelson Reilly had a group of people sing their last names, which form lyrics to Yankee Doodle Dandy. And Loretta Swit gave an interview about her life & career, after which the panel had to play a memory game in which they answered questions about information she reveal.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

logo

Plex.page is an Online Knowledge, where all the summaries are written by a machine. We aim to collect all the knowledge the World Wide Web has to offer.

Partners:
Nvidia inception logo

© All rights reserved
2021 made by Algoritmi Vision Inc.

If you believe that any of the summaries on our website lead to misinformation, don't hesitate to contact us. We will immediately review it and remove the summaries if necessary.

If your domain is listed as one of the sources on any summary, you can consider participating in the "Online Knowledge" program, if you want to proceed, please follow these instructions to apply.
However, if you still want us to remove all links leading to your domain from Plex.page and never use your website as a source, please follow these instructions.