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Types Of Mental Health Problems

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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General | Latest Info

Nami recognizes that other organizations have drawn distinctions between what diagnoses consider mental health conditions as opposed to mental illnesses. We intentionally use the terms Mental Health conditions and Mental Illness / es interchangeably. A Mental illness is a condition that affects a person's thinking, feeling,sss behavior or mood. These conditions deeply impact day - to - day living and may also affect ability to relate to others. If you have or think you might have Mental Illness, first thing you must know is that you are not alone. Mental health conditions are far more common than you think, mainly because people do like to, or are scar to, talk about them. However: 1 in 5 US adults experience mental illness each year. 1 in 25 US adults experience serious mental illness each year. 1 in 6 US youths aged 6 - 17 experience mental health disorder each year. 50% of all lifetime Mental Illness begins by age 14, and 75% by age 24. Mental health condition isnt result of one event. Research suggests multiple, linking causes. Genetics, environment and lifestyle influence whether someone develops a mental health condition. Stressful jobs or home life make some people more susceptible, as do traumatic life events. Biochemical processes and circuits and basic brain structure may play a role, too. None of this means that youre break or that you, or your family, do something wrong. Mental illness is no one's fault. And for many people, recovery, including meaningful roles in social life, school and work, is possible, especially when you start treatment early and play a strong role in your own recovery process. Following are trademarks of NAMI: NAMI, NAMI Basics, NAMI Connection, NAMI Ending Silence, NAMI FaithNet, NAMI Family & Friends, NAMI Family Support Group, NAMI Family - to - Family, NAMI Grading States, NAMI Hearts & Minds, NAMI Homefront, NAMI HelpLine, NAMI in Our Own Voice, NAMI on Campus, NAMI Parents & Teachers as Allies, NAMI Peer - to - Peer, NAMI Provider, NAMI Smarts for Advocacy, Act4MentalHealth, Vote4MentalHealth, NAMIWalks and National Alliance on Mental Illness. All other programs and services are trademarks of their respective owners.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Complementary Therapies and mental illness.

Traditional medical and therapeutic methods have improved over the years, but often they do not completely reduce or eliminate symptoms of mental illness. As a result, many people use complementary and alternative methods to help with recovery. These non - traditional treatments can be helpful, but it is important to remember that, unlike prescription medications, US Food and Drug Administration does not review or approve most of them. The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health is the main government agency for investigating non - traditional treatments for Mental Illness and other conditions. Complementary Health approaches, term favor by NCCAM, encompass three areas of unconventional treatment: Complementary methods where non - traditional treatments are given in addition to standard medical procedures Alternative methods of Treatment used instead of established Treatment Integrative methods that combine traditional and non - traditional as part of treatment plan following are trademarks of NAMI: NAMI, NAMI Basics, NAMI Connection, NAMI Ending Silence, NAMI FaithNet, NAMI Family & Friends, NAMI Family Support Group, NAMI Family - to - Family, NAMI Grading States, NAMI Hearts & Minds, NAMI Homefront, NAMI HelpLine, NAMI in Our Own Voice, NAMI on Campus, NAMI Parents & Teachers as Allies, NAMI Peer - to - Peer, NAMI Provider, NAMI Smarts for Advocacy, Act4MentalHealth, Vote4MentalHealth, NAMIWalks and National Alliance on Mental Illness. All other programs and services are trademarks of their respective owners.


About complementary treatments

Mindfulness is a type of meditation. It is when you focus on your mind and body and is a way of paying attention to the present moment. Example would be to focus on your breathing. Think about how it feels when you breathe in and out. When you practice meditation or mindfulness, you learn to be more aware of your thoughts and feelings. Once you are more aware of your thoughts and feelings, you can learn to deal with them better. Mindfulness based cognitive behavioural therapy is a combination of mindfulness and cognitive behavioural therapy. The National Institute of Health and Care Excellence recommends MCBT to treat depression. The course of MBCT should last for 8 weeks. You will usually have MBCT in group. Each session is 2 hours long. You should have 4 follow - up sessions in 12 months after the end of your therapy. You can also get mindfulness courses through self - help guides or mobile apps. You can find out more information about cognitive behavioural therapy here.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Stigma and mental illness

People with Mental Health problems say that social stigma attached to mental ill health and discrimination they experience can make their difficulties worse and make it harder to recover. Mental health problems are common. They affect thousands of people in the UK, and their friends, families, work colleagues and society in general. It is estimated that 1 in 6 people in the past week experienced common mental health problem. 10% of children and young people have clinically diagnosable mental problem. Depression is the predominant Mental Health problem worldwide, followed by anxiety, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Most people who experience mental health problems recover fully, or are able to live with and manage them, especially if they get help early on. But even though so many people are affect, there is a strong social stigma attached to mental ill health, and people with mental health problems can experience discrimination in all aspects of their lives. Many people's problems are made worse by stigma and discrimination they experience - from society, but also from families, friends and employers. Nearly nine out of ten people with Mental Health problems say that stigma and discrimination have a negative effect on their lives. We know that people with mental health problems are amongst the least likely of any group with long - term health condition or disability to: find work, be in steady, long - term relationship, live in decent housing, be socially included in mainstream society. This is because society in general has stereotyped views about mental illness and how it affects people. Many people believe that people with mental ill health are violent and dangerous, when in fact they are more at risk of being attacked or harming themselves than harming other people. Stigma and discrimination can also worsen someone's mental health problems, and delay or impede their getting help and treatment, and their recovery. Social isolation, poor housing, unemployment and poverty are all linked to mental ill health. So stigma and discrimination can trap people in a cycle of illness. The situation is exacerbated by the media. Media reports often link mental illness with violence, or portray people with mental health problems as dangerous, criminal,ss evil, or very disabled and unable to live normal, fulfilled lives. Research shows that the best way to challenge these stereotypes is through firsthand contact with people with experience of mental health problems. A number of national and local campaigns are trying to change public attitudes to Mental Illness. These include the National voluntary sector campaign Time to Change. The Equality Act 2010 makes it illegal to discriminate directly or indirectly against people with Mental Health problems in public services and functions, access to premises, work, education, associations and transport.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What is mental health?

Mental health issues are common in the United States. About one in five American adults experience at least one mental illness each year. And around one in five young people aged 13 to 18 experience mental illness at some point in their lives, too. Although mental illnesses are common, they vary in severity. About one in 25 adults experience serious mental illness each year. Smi can significantly reduce your ability to carry out daily life. Different groups of people experience SMIs at different rates. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, women are more likely to experience SMI than men. Those ages 18 to 25 are most likely to experience SMI. People with mixed - race background are also more likely to experience SMI than people of other ethnicities.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Estimates of the prevalence of common Mental Health Disorders vary considerably depending on where and when surveys are carried out, and the period over which prevalence is measure. The 2007 Office for National Statistics household Survey of adult Psychiatric morbidity in England found that 16. 2% of adults aged 16 to 64 years meet Diagnostic Criteria for at least one disorder in the week prior to interview. In three ONS surveys carried out so far, proportion of adults meeting criteria for at least one disorder increased between 1993 and 2000 but did not change between 2000 and 2007. The largest increase in the rate of disorders found between 1993 and 2007 was in women aged 45 to 64 years, among whom the rate went up by about one fifth. More than half of adults identified with common Mental Health disorder in the ONS Survey presented with mixed anxiety and depressive disorder. The 1 - week prevalence for other common Mental Health Disorders was 4. 4% for GAD, 2. 3% for depressive episode, 1. 4% for phobia, 1. 1% for OCD and 1. 1% for panic disorder. In the US, Kessler and colleagues conducted the National Comorbidity Survey, representative household interview Survey of 9 282 adults aged 18 years and over, to estimate lifetime and 12 - month prevalence rates of Mental Disorders classified using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders of American Psychiatric Association. A summary of their findings can be seen in Table 1. Of 12 - month cases in the US National Comorbidity Survey, 22. 3% were classified as serious, 37. 3% as moderate and 40. 4% as mild. Fifty - five per cent carry only a single diagnosis, 22% two diagnoses and 23% three or more diagnoses. Latent class analysis identifies three highly comorbid classes representing 7% of the population, and the authors conclude that, although mental disorders are widespread, serious cases are concentrated among a relatively small proportion of people with high comorbidity. In summary, at any given time, common Mental Health Disorders can be found in around one in six people in the community, and around half of these have significant symptoms that would warrant intervention from healthcare professionals. Most have non - specific mixed anxiety and depressive symptoms, but a proportion have more specific depressive disorders or Anxiety Disorders including panic disorder, phobias, OCD or PTSD. Location, time and duration of survey are not only factors that influence prevalence rates. A number of demographic and socioeconomic factors are associated with higher risk of Disorders, including gender, age, marital status, ethnicity and socioeconomic deprivation. These will be discussed below.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Bipolar and Related Disorders

Table

People having a manic episode may:People having a depressive episode may:
Feel very up, high, elated, or irritable or touchyFeel very sad, down, empty, worried, or hopeless
Feel jumpy or wiredFeel slowed down or restless
Have a decreased need for sleepHave trouble falling asleep, wake up too early, or sleep too much
Have a loss of appetiteExperience increased appetite and weight gain
Talk very fast about a lot of different thingsTalk very slowly, feel like they have nothing to say, forget a lot
Feel like their thoughts are racingHave trouble concentrating or making decisions
Think they can do a lot of things at onceFeel unable to do even simple things
Do risky things that show poor judgment, such as eat and drink excessively, spend or give away a lot of money, or have reckless sexHave little interest in almost all activities, a decreased or absent sex drive, or an inability to experience pleasure (anhedonia)
Feel like they are unusually important, talented, or powerfulFeel hopeless or worthless, think about death or suicide

A Manic episode is a period of at least one week when a person is very high spirit or irritable in extreme way most of day for most days, has more energy than usual and experiences at least three of following, showing change in behavior: exaggerated self - esteem or grandiosity. Less need for sleep Talking more than usual, Talking loudly and quickly Easily distract Doing many activities at once, scheduling more events in a day than can be accomplished Increased risky behavior, uncontrollable racing thoughts or quickly changing ideas or topics Changes are significant and clear to friends and Family. Symptoms are severe enough to cause dysfunction and problems with work, family or social activities and responsibilities. Symptoms of manic episode may require person to get hospital care to stay safe. The average age for the first manic episode is 18, but it can start anytime from early childhood to later adulthood.


Overview

Experiencing changes in your mood is part of being human. However, if you have Bipolar Disorder, your mood changes will be more extreme and may last for longer periods. You are likely to experience two highly contrasting mood states - mania and depression. During mania, you can feel elated and euphoric. You may have lots of energy, and feel you don't need as much sleep as usual. Your thoughts may race and you may also talk fast. You can be life of party and feel confident and invincible. As mania continue, you may start feeling irritable and aggressive. Your thoughts can become muddled or even delusional. During depression, you can feel pessimistic and very low. You may have little energy and can experience changes to your sleeping pattern - from insomnia to excessive sleeping. You may burst into tears for no apparent reason, and withdraw from social life. Your thoughts may be slow, and concentration can be poor, as can interest in daily life. You may feel hopeless and have thoughts of ending your life. There are different types of Bipolar Disorder, and they can vary greatly in how strongly you experience mood changes - although all forms of Bipolar Disorder can seriously affect how you live your life. Bipolar episodes usually last at least a week, and the time between episodes can differ from person to person, and over time - from days to months, or years. You may have just one or two in your whole life. It can be difficult to identify Bipolar Disorder, as changes to your mood might seem like separate and unconnected events. For this reason, some people can go for years without being diagnose. Bipolar and related disorders can start at any age, although they are more likely to start in teen years or early twenties. Bipolar Disorder affects at least 1 in every 50 adult Australians every year.


Signs and Symptoms

Mania and hypomania are two distinct types of episodes, but they have the same symptoms. Mania is more severe than hypomania and causes more noticeable problems at work, school and social activities, as well as relationship difficulties. Mania may also trigger a break from reality and require hospitalization. Both manic and hypomanic episodes include three or more of these symptoms: abnormally upbeat, jumpy or wire increased activity, energy or agitation Exaggerated sense of well - being and self - confidence decreased need for sleep Unusual talkativeness Racing thoughts Distractibility Poor decision - making, for example, going on buying sprees, Taking sexual risks or making foolish investments


Diagnosis

To diagnose bipolar disorder, doctors may perform physical examination, conduct interviews and order lab tests. While bipolar disorder cannot be seen on blood test or body scan, these tests can help rule out other illnesses that can resemble disorder, such as hyperthyroidism. If no other illnesses are causing symptoms, doctor may recommend mental health care. To be diagnosed with bipolar disorder, person must have experienced at least one episode of mania or hypomania. Mental health care professionals use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders to diagnose the type of bipolar disorder a person may be experiencing. To determine what type of bipolar disorder a person has, Mental Health care professionals assess the pattern of symptoms and how impaired a person is during their most severe episodes.


Risk Factors

Researchers are studying possible causes of bipolar disorder. Most agree that there is no single cause and it is likely that many factors contribute to persons chance of having illness. Brain Structure and Functioning: Some studies indicate that the brains of people with bipolar disorder may differ from the brains of people who do not have bipolar disorder or any other mental disorder. Learning more about these differences may help scientists understand bipolar disorder and determine which treatments will work best. At this time, health care providers base diagnosis and treatment plans on people's symptoms and history, rather than brain imaging or other diagnostic tests.


Treatments and Therapies

Psychotherapy, also called TALK Therapy, can be an effective part of treatment plan for people with bipolar disorder. Psychotherapy is term for a variety of treatment techniques that aim to HELP person identify and change troubling emotions, thoughts, and behaviors. It can provide support, education, and guidance to people with bipolar disorder and their families. Treatment may include therapies such as cognitive - Behavioral Therapy and psychoeducation, which are used to treat a variety of conditions. Treatment may also include newer therapies designed specifically for treatment of bipolar disorder, including interpersonal and social rhythm Therapy and family - focused Therapy. Determining whether intensive psychotherapeutic intervention at the earliest stages of bipolar disorder can prevent or limit its full - blown onset is an important area of ongoing research. Visit NIMHs Psychotherapies webpage to learn about various types of Psychotherapies.


Causes

Scientists have not yet discovered a single cause of bipolar disorder. Currently, they believe several factors may contribute, including: genetics. The chances of developing bipolar disorder increase if children's parents or siblings have disorder. But the role of genetics is not absolute: children from a family with a history of bipolar disorder may never develop the disorder. Studies of identical twins have found that, even if one twin develops a disorder, other may not. Stress. Stressful events such as death in family, illness, difficult relationship, divorce or financial problems can trigger manic or depressive episode. Thus, persons handling of stress may also play a role in the development of illness. Brain structure and function. Brain scans cannot diagnose bipolar disorder, yet researchers have identified subtle differences in average size or activation of some brain structures in people with bipolar disorder.


What are the symptoms of bipolar disorder?

There are three basic types of Bipolar Disorder; all of them involve clear changes in mood, energy, and activity levels. These moods range from periods of extremely up, elate, and energized behavior or increased activity levels to very sad, down, hopeless, or low activity - level periods. People with Bipolar Disorder also have normal mood alternating with depression. Four or more episodes of mania or depression in a year are term rapid cycling. Bipolar I Disorder is defined by manic episodes that last at least seven days or when manic symptoms are so severe that hospital care is needed. Usually, separate depressive episodes occur as well, typically lasting at least two weeks. Episodes of mood disturbances with mixed features are also possible. Bipolar II Disorder is defined by a pattern of depressive episodes and hypomanic episodes, but not full - blown manic episodes described above. Cyclothymic Disorder is defined by persistent hypomanic and depressive symptoms that are not intense enough or do not last long enough to qualify as hypomanic or depressive episodes. Symptoms usually occur for at least two years in adults and for one year in children and teenagers. Other Specified and Unspecified Bipolar and Related Disorders is a category that refers to Bipolar Disorder symptoms that do not match any of the recognized categories.

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Table2

Symptoms of a Manic EpisodeSymptoms of a Depressive Episode
Feeling very up, high, elated, or extremely irritable or touchyFeeling very down or sad, or anxious
Feeling jumpy or wired, more active than usualFeeling slowed down or restless
Racing thoughtsTrouble concentrating or making decisions
Decreased need for sleepTrouble falling asleep, waking up too early, or sleeping too much
Talking fast about a lot of different things (flight of ideas)Talking very slowly, feeling like you have nothing to say, or forgetting a lot
Excessive appetite for food, drinking, sex, or other pleasurable activitiesLack of interest in almost all activities
Thinking you can do a lot of things at once without getting tiredUnable to do even simple things
Feeling like you are unusually important, talented, or powerfulFeeling hopeless or worthless, or thinking about death or suicide
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Anxiety Disorders

Anxiety is a normal emotion. Itas your mental way of reacting to stress and alerting you of potential danger ahead. Everyone feels anxious now and then. For example, you may worry when faced with problem at work, before taking a test, or before making an important decision. Occasional anxiety is OK. But anxiety disorders are different. Theyare group of mental illnesses that cause constant and overwhelming anxiety and fear. Excessive anxiety can make you avoid work, school, family get - togethers, and other social situations that might trigger or worsen your symptoms. With treatment, many people with Anxiety Disorders can manage their feelings.


Signs and Symptoms

People with panic disorder have recurrent unexpected panic attacks. Panic attacks are sudden periods of intense fear that come on quickly and reach their peak within minutes. Attacks can occur unexpectedly or can be brought on by trigger, such as a feared object or situation. Heart palpitations, pounding heartbeat, or accelerated heartrate Sweating, Trembling or shaking Sensations of shortness of breath, smothering, or choking Feelings of impending doom, Feelings of being out of control People with panic disorder often worry about when the next attack will happen and actively try to prevent future attacks by avoiding places, situations, or behaviors they associate with panic attacks. Worry about panic attacks, and effort spent trying to avoid attacks, cause significant problems in various areas of people's lives, including the development of agoraphobia.


Treatments and Therapies

Some people with anxiety disorders might benefit from joining self - help or support group and sharing their problems and achievements with others. Internet chat rooms might also be useful, but any advice received over the Internet should be used with caution, as Internet acquaintances have usually never seen each other and what has helped one person is not necessarily what is best for another. You should always check with your doctor before following any treatment advice found on the Internet. Talking with trusted friend or member of clergy can also provide support, but it is not necessarily a sufficient alternative to care from a doctor or other health professional.


Causes

For some people, anxiety may be linked to underlying health issue. In some cases, anxiety signs and symptoms are first indicators of medical illness. If your doctor suspects your anxiety may have medical cause, he or she may order tests to look for signs of a problem. Examples of medical problems that can be linked to anxiety include: heart disease, Diabetes Thyroid problems, such as hyperthyroidism, Respiratory disorders, such as Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma, Drug misuse or Withdrawal Withdrawal from alcohol, anti - anxiety medications or other medications, Chronic pain or irritable bowel syndrome, Rare tumors that produce certain fight - or - flight hormones sometimes anxiety can be side effect of certain medications. It's possible that your anxiety may be due to underlying medical condition if: You don't have any blood relatives with anxiety disorder. You didn't have anxiety disorder as a child. You don't avoid certain things or situations because of anxiety. You have a sudden occurrence of anxiety that seems unrelated to life events and you do have a previous history of anxiety.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Dissociative Disorders

Most people daydream now and then, and if that happens to you, it's perfectly normal. But if you have a mental health problem called dissociation, your sense of disconnect from the world around you is often a lot more complicated than that. Dissociation is a break in how your mind handles information. You may feel disconnected from your thoughts, feelings, memories, and surroundings. It can affect your sense of identity and your perception of time. Symptoms often go away on their own. It may take hours, days, or weeks. You may need treatment, though, if your dissociation is happening because you 've had extremely troubling experience or you have a Mental Health Disorder like schizophrenia.


Symptoms

Significant memory loss of specific times, people and events Out - of - body experiences, such as feeling as though you are watching a movie of yourself. Mental health problems such as depression, anxiety and thoughts of suicide, sense of detachment from your emotions, or emotional numbness, lack of sense of self - identity symptoms of dissociative Disorders depend on the type of disorder that has been diagnose. There are three types of dissociative Disorders defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: dissociative Amnesia. The main symptom is difficulty remembering important information about one self. Dissociative Amnesia may surround particular event, such as combat or abuse, or more rarely, information about identity and life history. Onset for amazing episodes is usually sudden, and episodes can last minutes, hours, days, or, rarely, months or years. There is no average for age onset or percentage, and a person may experience multiple episodes throughout her life. Depersonalization disorder. This disorder involves ongoing feelings of detachment from actions, feelings, thoughts and sensations as if they are watching a movie. Sometimes other people and things may feel like people and things in the world around them are unreal. A person may experience depersonalization, derealization or both. Symptoms can last just a matter of moments or return at times over years. The average onset age is 16, although depersonalization episodes can start anywhere from early to middle childhood. Less than 20% of people with this disorder start experiencing episodes after the age of 20. Dissociative identity disorder. Formerly known as multiple personality disorder, this disorder is characterized by alternating between multiple identities. A person may feel like one or more voices are trying to take control of their head. Often these identities may have unique names, characteristics, mannerisms and voices. People with do will experience gaps in memory of every day events, personal information and trauma. Women are more likely to be diagnose, as they more frequently present with acute dissociative symptoms. Men are more likely to deny symptoms and trauma histories, and commonly exhibit more violent behavior, rather than Amnesia or fugue states. This can lead to elevated false negative diagnosis.


Causes

You may psychologically disconnect from the present moment if something really bad happens to you. This is called peritraumatic dissociation. Experts believe this is a technique your mind uses to protect you from the full impact of an upsetting experience you had. Peritraumatic dissociation can happen when you 've been through things like: sexual or physical assault, childhood abuse, Combat Torture or capture motor vehicle accidents, natural disasters. If you 've had disturbing experiences over and over, you may get severe forms of dissociation known as dissociative disorders. You may leave your normal consciousness, forget things, or form different identities within your mind. Hypnosis. When you daydream or let your mind wander, you are in a type of auto - hypnotic state. You may no longer have strong awareness of your body. Other types of hypnosis may put you in a deeper dissociated state. A Trained professional may use therapeutic hypnotherapy to help you manage pain, anxiety, addictive behaviors, or posttraumatic stress disorder. Certain drugs. You may lose your sense of identity or reality if you drink alcohol or take illicit drugs. Research shows that people who take psychedelics, like psilocybin and LSD, report briefly losing their sense of self. Meditation. Like daydreaming, you may become less aware of here and now while you meditate. Some expert meditators say they lose awareness of their self or body during certain mindfulness meditation practices.


Treatment

Talking therapies are usually recommended for dissociation. There are lots of different types of talking therapy. Different ones might be used for different dissociative disorders. Psychodynamic psychotherapy If you have do then your doctors may think about long - term psychodynamic psychotherapy. This is a type of therapy where you talk about your relationships and thoughts. You might talk about your past. Your therapist can link the ways you think and act with things that have happened to you. For do, psychotherapy might be needed for a long time, with at least 1 session every week. This might be increased if your do is quite complex, or if it causes you lots of problems. Eye movement desensitisation reprocessing may also be helped by eye - movement desensitization and reprocessing. In EMDR you make side - to - side eye movements while talking about trauma that happen. Nobody fully understands how EMDR works, but it could help you to deal with past trauma and flashbacks. Doctors must be careful when using EMDR because it could make you worse if not do properly. But EMDR can have benefits when it is used along with other treatment.S type of EMDR used for do is slightly different to other conditions. So it is important that your doctor know about your do before you start EMDR. Cognitive behavioural therapy is another type of talking therapy. You will talk about way your thoughts and feelings could cause emotional problems. And how your behaviour may make this worse. You focus less on the past and try to change the way you think and behave. Parts of CBT are recommended to treat do, by helping you to change your thoughts and behaviours that come from trauma. Cbt approach has also been suggested for long - lasting DPDR. If you have DPDR, you might often worry about your symptoms and think you have serious mental illness or that something is wrong with your brain. Cbt may help to change this way of thinking. By reducing your anxiety and depression that come with this worrying, it may also reduce your symptoms of DPDR.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Somatic Symptom Disorders

Somatic symptom disorders occur when a person feels extreme, exaggerated anxiety about physical symptoms. A person has such intense thoughts, feelings, and behaviors related to symptoms, that they feel they cannot do some of the activities of daily life. They may believe routine medical problems are life threatening. This anxiety may not improve despite normal test results and reassurance from health care provider. A person with SSD is not faking their symptoms. Pain and other problems are real. They may be caused by medical problem. Often, no physical cause can be find. However, it is extreme reaction and behaviors to symptoms that are the main problem. Ssd usually begins before age 30. It occurs more often in women than in men. It's not clear why some people develop this condition. Certain factors may be involve: Having negative outlook Being more physically and emotionally sensitive to pain and other sensations Family history or upbringing Genetics People who have a history of physical or sexual abuse may be more likely to have this disorder. But not everyone with SSD has a history of abuse. Ssd is similar to illness anxiety disorder. This is when people are overly anxious about becoming sick or developing serious disease. They fully expect they will become very ill at some point. Unlike SSD, with illness anxiety disorder, there are few or no actual physical symptoms. Pain, fatigue or weakness, Shortness of breath symptoms may be mild to severe. There may be one or more symptoms. They may come and go or change. Symptoms may be due to medical condition but they also may have no clear cause. How people feel and behave in response to these physical sensations are main symptoms of SSD. These reactions must persist for 6 months or more. People with SSD may: feel extreme anxiety about symptoms Feel concerned that mild symptoms are sign of serious disease go to the doctor for multiple tests and procedures, but not believe results Feel that the doctor does not take their symptoms seriously enough or has not done a good job treating problems Spend lot of time and energy dealing with health concerns Have Trouble functioning because of thoughts, feelings, and Behaviors about symptoms

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Disruptive Disorders

Disruptive behavior disorders can seriously impact children's daily lives. Children with disruptive behavior disorders show ongoing patterns of uncooperative and defiant behavior. Their responses to authority figures range from indifference to hostility. Their behavior frequently impacts those around them, including teachers, peers, and family members. Most common types of disruptive behavior disorders include disruptive behavior disorder not otherwise specify, oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder. Children with these behavioral disorders can be stubborn, difficult, disobedient, and irritable. Children with conduct disorder show the same responses to authority figures as discussed above, but in addition, they have a tendency to be physically aggressive and both actively and intentionally violate others rights. The main differences between these disorders are severity, intensity and intentionality of behavior exhibited by child.


Oppositional Defiant Disorder

Many children with ADHD display oppositional behaviors at times. Oppositional Defiant Disorder is defined in the American Psychiatric Associations Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition as including persistent symptoms of negativistic, defiant, disobedient, and hostile behaviors toward authority figures. A child with ODD may argue frequently with adults; lose their temper easily; refuse to follow rules; blame others for their own mistakes; deliberately annoy others; and otherwise behave in angry, resentful, and vindictive ways. He is likely to encounter frequent social conflicts and disciplinary situations at school. In many cases, particularly without early diagnosis and treatment, these symptoms worsen over timesometimes becoming severe enough to eventually lead to diagnosis of conduct disorder.


Treatment

Children with ADHD and disruptive behavior disorders often benefit from special behavioral techniques that can be implemented at home and at school. These approaches typically include methods for training your child to become more aware of his own anger cues, use these cues as signals to initiate various coping strategies, and provide himself with positive reinforcement for successful self - control. You and your children's teachers, meanwhile, can learn to better manage ODD or CD - type behavior through negotiating, compromising, problem - solving with your child, anticipating and avoiding potentially explosive situations, and prioritizing goals so that less important problems are ignored until more pressing issues have been successfully address. These highly specific techniques can be taught by professional behavior therapists or other mental health professionals recommended by your children's pediatrician or school psychologist, or other professionals involved with your family. If your child has a diagnosis of coexisting ODD or CD, and well - planned classroom behavioral techniques in his mainstream classroom have been ineffective, this may lead to a decision to place him in a special classroom at school that is set up for more intensive behavior management. However, schools are mandated to educate your child in mainstream classroom if possible, and to regularly review your children's education plan and reassess the appropriateness of his placement. There is growing evidence that same stimulant medications that improve core ADHD symptoms may also help coexisting ODD and CD. Stimulants have been shown to help decrease verbal and physical aggression, negative peer interactions, stealing, and vandalism. Although stimulant medications do not teach children new skills, such as helping them identify and respond appropriately to others ' social signals, they may decrease aggression that stands in the way of forming relationships with others their age. For this reason, stimulants are usually the first choice in medication treatment approach for children with ADHD and coexisting disruptive behavior disorder. Earlier stimulants were introduced to treat coexisting ODD or CD, better. A child with a disruptive behavior disorder whose aggressive behavior continues untreated may start to identify with others who experience discipline problems. By adolescence, he may resist treatment that could help him change his behavior and make him less popular among these friends. He will have grown accustomed to his defiant self and feel uncomfortable and unreal when stimulants help check his reckless, authority - flaunting style. By treating these behaviors in elementary school or even earlier, you may have a better chance of preventing your child from creating negative self - identity. If your child has been treated with 2 or more types of stimulants and his aggressive symptoms are the same or worse, his pediatrician may choose to reevaluate the situation and replace stimulants with other medications. If stimulant medication alone leads to some but not enough improvement, his pediatrician may continue to prescribe stimulants in combination with one of these other agents.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Depressive Disorders

Depressive disorders are a type of Mood Disorder that includes a number of conditions. They are all characterized by the presence of SAD, empty, or irritable moods accompanied by physical and cognitive symptoms. They differ in terms of duration, timing, or presume etiology. Disruptive Mood dysregulation Disorder: childhood condition characterized by extreme anger and Irritability. Children display frequent and intense outbursts of temper. Major Depressive Disorder: condition characterized by loss of interest in activities and depressed mood, which leads to significant impairments in how a person is able to function. Persistent Depressive Disorder: This is a type of ongoing, chronic Depression that is characterized by other symptoms of Depression that, while often less severe, are longer lasting. Diagnosis requires experiencing depressed mood on most days for a period of at least two years. Other or unspecified Depressive Disorder: this diagnosis is for cases when symptoms do not meet criteria for diagnosis of another Depressive Disorder, but they still create problems with an individual's life and functioning. Premenstrual dysphoric Disorder: This condition is a form of Premenstrual syndrome characterized by Significant Depression, Irritability, and Anxiety that begins a week or two before menstruation begins. Symptoms usually go away within a few day's following woman's period. Substance / medication - induced Depressive Disorder: This condition occurs when an individual experiences symptoms of Depressive Disorder either while using alcohol or other substances or while going through withdrawal from substance. Depressive Disorder due to another medical condition: This condition is diagnosed when a person's medical history suggests that their depressive symptoms may be the result of a medical condition. Medical conditions that may contribute to or cause Depression include diabetes, stroke, Parkinson's disease, autoimmune conditions, chronic pain conditions, cancer, infections and HIV / AIDS. Depressive disorders are all characterized by feelings of sadness and low mood that are persistent and severe enough to affect how a person functions. Common symptoms shared by these disorders include difficulty feeling interested and motivate, lack of interest in previously enjoyed activities, sleep disturbances, and poor concentration. Diagnostic criteria vary for each specific condition. For Major Depressive Disorder, diagnosis requires an individual to experience five or more of following symptoms over SAMe two - week period. One of these symptoms must include either depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure in previously enjoyed activities. Symptoms can include: Depressed mood for most or all of the day decrease or Lack of interest in activities individual previously enjoyed Significant weight Loss or gain, or decrease or increase Appetite Sleep disturbances Feelings of slowed physical activity or restlessness Lack of energy or fatigue that lasts most or all of day Feelings of guilt or worthlessness Difficulty thinking or concentrating Preoccupation With death or Thoughts of suicide treatments for Depressive disorders often involve combination of Psychotherapy and medications.


Overview

If you are concerned that you may have a mood disorder, make an appointment to see your doctor or mental health professional as soon as you can. If you are reluctant to seek treatment, talk to a friend or loved one, faith leader, or someone else you trust. Feel like your emotions are interfering with your work, relationships, social activities or other parts of your life. If you have trouble with drinking or drugs, have suicidal thoughts or behaviors, seek emergency treatment immediately. Your mood disorder is unlikely to simply go away on its own, and it may get worse over time. Seek professional help before your mood disorder becomes severe. It may be easier to treat early on.


What Is Depression?

Depression is among the most treatable mental disorders. Between 80 percent and 90 percent of people with depression eventually respond well to treatment. Almost all patients gain some relief from their symptoms. Before diagnosis or treatment, health professional should conduct thorough diagnostic evaluation, including interview and possibly physical examination. In some cases, blood test might be done to make sure depression is not due to medical condition like thyroid problem. Evaluation is to identify specific symptoms, medical and family history, cultural factors and environmental factors to arrive at diagnosis and plan a course of action. Antidepressants may produce some improvement within the first week or two of use. Full benefits may not be seen for two to three months. If a patient feels little or no improvement after several weeks, his or her psychiatrist can alter the dose of medication or add or substitute another antidepressant. In some situations, other psychotropic medications may be helpful. It is important to let your doctor know if medication does not work or if you experience side effects. Psychiatrists usually recommend that patients continue to take medication for six or more months after symptoms have improve. Longer - term maintenance treatment may be suggested to decrease the risk of future episodes for certain people at high risk. Psychotherapy may involve only individual, but it can include others. For example, family or couple Therapy can help address issues within these close relationships. Group Therapy involves people with similar illnesses. Depending on the severity of depression, treatment can take a few weeks or much longer. In many cases, significant improvement can be made in 10 to 15 sessions. Electroconvulsive Therapy is a medical treatment most commonly used for patients with severe major depression or bipolar disorder who have not responded to other treatments. It involves brief electrical stimulation of the brain while the patient is under anesthesia. Patients typically receive ECT two to three times a week for a total of six to 12 treatments. Ect has been in use since the 1940s, and many years of research have led to major improvements. It is usually managed by a team of trained medical professionals including a psychiatrist,s anesthesiologist and nurse or physician assistant.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a chronic psychiatric condition that affects people's thinking, feeling,s and behavior. It is a complex, long - term condition that affects about one percent of people in the United States. Dsm - 5 diagnostic criteria specify that two or more symptoms of schizophrenia must be present for a period of at least one month. Delusions: beliefs that conflict with reality. Hallucinations: seeing or hearing things that aren't really there disorganizes speech: words do not follow the rules of language and may be impossible to understand. Grossly disorganized or catatonic behavior: confused thinking, bizarre behavior or movements Negative symptoms: inability to initiate plans, speak, express emotions, or feel pleasure diagnosis also requires significant impairments in social or occupational functioning for a period of at least six months. The onset of schizophrenia is usually in late teens or early 20s, with men usually showing symptoms earlier than women. Earlier signs of condition that may occur before diagnosis include poor motivation, difficult relationships, and poor school performance. The National Institute of Mental Health suggests that multiple factors may play a role in causing schizophrenia, including genetics, brain chemistry, environmental factors, and substance use.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Depression

While bad moods are common, and usually pass in short period, people suffering from mood disorders live with more constant and severe symptoms. People living with this mental illness find that their mood impacts both mental and psychological well - being, nearly every day, and often for much of the day. It is estimated that 1 in 10 adults suffer from some type of mood disorder, with the most common conditions being depression and bipolar disorder. With proper diagnosis and treatment, most those living with mood disorders lead healthy, normal and productive lives. If left untreated, this illness can affect role functioning, quality of life and many long - lasting physical health problems such as diabetes and heart disease.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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